Is there a best binocular for astronomy? We could point you to one of the best in the Fujinon 25X150 MT or it's sibling with 40X magnification. They both have terrific optics, but neither will do any good if it's not used. Your OpticsReviewer proposes that, aside from ensuring you have fundamentally good optics in good housings, the best astronomy binoculars are the ones that are used and help a person to learn more about the celestial bodies around this globe.
Generally the better the anti-reflective coatings, the better the resulting image and the better the binoculars will perform across a wide range of lighting conditions. The best performing coatings are expensive to produce and difficult to apply, and typically add considerably to the cost of the finished binocular. These coatings are perhaps the main differentiating factor between premium or “alpha” class binoculars and other models.
For four generations, we’ve relied on family-centric values and the examples of character Vernon Kinsey, our founder, gave us. When life challenged Vernon, leaving him paralyzed below the waist, he turned his passion for archery into a profession. He persevered, built a successful business, treated everyone with respect and never let challenges hold him back. Today, Kinsey’s Outdoors honors Vernon’s legacy as we continuously strive to spread and support a love of the outdoors, spending time hunting and fishing with family and friends. 
Inferior image quality at lower price points: because roof prisms reflect light off more internal surfaces than porro-prisms, all other things being equal they tend to produce a darker image. They also suffer from a phenomenon known as phase shifting which degrades the sharpness of the final image. High quality roof prism binoculars include special phase-correction, high-transmission coatings on the prism surfaces to counteract these negative effects. Roof prisms can match and surpass the quality of porro-prisms, but at a price.

"I was introduced to these binoculars when taking a bird-watching class. I already had some inexpensive 'permanent focus' binos, and these Pentax binoculars were a revelation! Crisp depth of field for the sharpest images make these the choice for bird/animal watching. Easy and simple focusing system, with retractable eye cups for eyeglass wearers. Can't beat these binoculars for the price!"


The white highlands, nestled between the maria, are older terrain pockmarked by thousands of craters that formed over the eons. Some of the larger craters are visible in binoculars. One of them, Tycho, emanates long swatches of white rays for hundreds of miles over the adjacent highlands. This is material kicked out during the Tycho impact 2.5 million years ago.
Binoculars are generally described with two numbers, separated by an x, such as 8x42. The first number refers to the magnification, or how many times larger the bins will make something appear. The second number refers to the diameter of the objective lens (the big lenses at the front) in millimeters. Larger objective lenses mean more light makes it to your eyes, resulting in a brighter image, but also means a larger size and weight. It's important to know what numbers you should be looking for in a pair of bins, so we broke down the ideal uses for all magnifications and objective lens sizes below.
Finally, how heavy are the lenses? Will you be fatigued holding them up for long periods of time as you view the sky?  A junior astronomer might be better off with an H body type binocular because they are more lightweight and compact. An adult or more “expert” stargazer may prefer the classic look and feel of a Porro prism style body, and can handle the extra bulk.

The accuracy is mostly due to the advanced ranging modes available on the Fusion 1 Mile. They allow the user to provide hints on how to interpret readings based on his or her surrounding circumstances. This decreases the chances of inaccurate readings based on tricky scenarios. The abilities of the Bushnell 1 Mile are impressive for any model, but they are even more exceptional considering the cost of these binoculars. This model can by purchased for less than $1,000.


These Vortex are really nice, with phase-corrected prisms to keep images sharp and colors accurate, and wide angles of view. They're water and fogproof also, so they'll stand up to inclement weather great. I also like the mid-sized 42mm objectives which will give them good low-light capabilities when a lot of game . https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1200179-REG/vortex_db_204_8x42_diamondback_binocular_green_black.html
Rangefinders are an important part of your hunting or sporting routine. It is a device which allows you to measure the distance between you and the target. On the other hand, binoculars are the device which is used to observe objects which are further away from us. When these devices were combined to make a binocular which can also show the range between you and the object, it resulted in the manufacture of rangefinder binoculars. Rangefinder binoculars are extremely handy because of the ease of use and the features it has.
Binoculars are an essential tool for birders, but with so many models on the market, it can be daunting to find the perfect pair. So we turned to professional ornithologists and dedicated birders. In August, attendees at the North American Ornithological Conference and members of the Brooklyn Bird Club sacrificed leisurely breakfasts, lunch breaks, and cocktail hours to test more than 30 pairs of binoculars from 11 companies under a range of conditions.
A new company that we just brought into stock is GPO USA. Offered in 8x and 10x they are packed with the performance features you want: ED glass, Phase-corrected BAK4 prisms, Nitrogen-filled, Magnesium chassis, all the bells and whistles. I got a chance to try out the 8.5x50 version and they were incredible during the day, at dusk, and at night. The 42mm and 50mm both fall into your price range.
Alpen Shasta Ridge: Though we loved this company’s more-expensive Midas model, we were less impressed with this cheaper sibling. Focusing was difficult, feeling soft and difficult to get exactly right. These also offered noticeably inferior light-gathering compared with the Athlon Optics Midas ED pair. Plus, since we tested this pair Alpen has ceased operations. We expect these to become hard to find.
Which are all crucial considerations, as binoculars tend to be highly subjective. It’s helpful to think of a pair as you might a new car: you want a rare symbiotic union of stylistic penchants, pragmatic details and clarity of vision that all mesh with whatever price point you’re willing to live with. Because the moment you drive it off the lot, the resale value craps out. There’s no monolithic pair that everyone should own, no starter set that’s worth the $200 you could just apply towards pricier lifetime binoculars. While cost is often a barometer of quality, it’s not always. Instead, a thornier set of metrics obtains: are you after high magnification for long-range birding — owls and shorebirds and the like — or will 7x or 8x suffice? Do you want a lightweight pair to stow in your glove compartment, carry-on or briefcase? How important is balance, overall feel, focus, and what birders call “eye relief” (basically visual ergonomics) to you? Because they’re different for everyone. In short, will you be driving an Audi 6 or a Ford Fusion?

Best for City Birding: As bad as it sounds, rising at 5:00 a.m. has its rewards. Even on a murky spring day, the sky can have a surreal spark. Our resident downy woodpecker, an outlier camped among cardinals and chickadees, begins to lope and scamper in the breeze, tracing a parabolic line from trunk to trunk. We also have some nuthatches, goldfinches, titmice, and very occasionally a yellow-bellied sapsucker. We’re up high, third floor, facing east and west, a real hierarchy of light. Sometimes the morning sun is so enormous it’s as if a great fire is swallowing Back Bay, precisely the kind of place that requires a huge field of view, and the Diamondback has the largest of its class: 420 feet at 1,000 yards.
If, as you turn the focus, little rays start growing out of the star in all directions before the rest of the star comes down to focus, you're looking at spherical aberration. This problem too may be in your own eye, even if you're wearing your glasses. If it is, all binoculars with a given size exit pupil will show the same problem. To reduce it, choose higher-power binoculars; these yield a smaller exit pupil for a given aperture. Unfortunately, your eye's spherical aberration cannot be corrected with glasses.
What these coatings do is to assist light transmission. It is important to note how the manufacturer describes their coatings as they are not all created equal. Ideally you want to see "Fully Multi-Coated" which means that all air to glass surfaces have received multiple layers of antireflection coatings. If you just see "Fully Coated" or "Multi-Coated" it means only some surfaces have coatings or they only have a single coating and thus will not perform anywhere near as well as Fully Multi-Coated binoculars assuming everything else is equal.
"These are excellent binoculars. I purchased 3 pair in person before taking a birding friend's advice. These are highly rated for the price, and deserving. I have used these for birding for a year now (twice a week), and I am very pleased. They are well constructed, and I have had 0 problems with them. I highly recommend purchasing these Bushnell Legend L-Series Binoculars for any nature lover, or birder."
Highly rated (above 4 stars from more than 5000 satisfied customers on Amazon only) Skymaster 15X70 binoculars are the preferred choice of any seasoned astronomer. A large objective lens of 70mm with multi coated optics provides a brighter and sharper view of further celestial objects like nebulae, galaxies (Andromeda, M81, M82, M44, M50, etc.), star clusters, and the moons around Jupiter.
Binoculars with rangefinders are undoubtedly one of the most popular pieces of optical equipment today. You can spot more and more of them out in the woods, as well as on the shooting range. Rangefinder binoculars are, actually, so popular, that some industry leaders predict that traditional binoculars, the ones that don’t have any distance information built-in, won’t exist in 15 to 20 years. Why, you may ask? Because binoculars with rangefinders are relatively common and the technology pretty ubiquitous. Now, to be honest, many of us won’t really think that we need binoculars with rangefinders for hunting, or for the shooting range but, the truth is, having one will prove to be useful sooner or later. Let’s take a better look at them.
Just remember the best pair of binoculars are the ones you use. If they are comfortable and work for what you want them too, then they are the right pair of binoculars. If you are thinking about upgrading your current pair, please consider donating your old pair. The Birders' Exchange supports bird watching programs and research in South America. You can always give your old pair to them. If you are still on the lookout for the best contender, consider reading over our Buying Advice.
The EL only has one downside, and it's a big one: price. Listing for $2,888 these bins cost as much as a used car and are more of an investment than a purchase. However, if you're a serious birder or wildlife watcher that wants the absolute best, or you're embarking on a once in a lifetime safari, these bins will undoubtedly elevate your experience.
Also concerning zoom binoculars stay away from them. Zoom binoculars show up in greater numbers for repairs than any other design. They were originally developed as a “gimmick” to encourage sales simulating the success of sales of zoom camera lenses.U.S. military specification design is still the best design for binoculars, although not as popular as the center focus design. If someone is advertising their binoculars as “military design binoculars, just make sure they are U.S. military design and not someone else’s military. U.S. military specification design means that each eyepiece has to be focused for each eye, that the barrels of the binocular are sealed or water proofed, and filled with nitrogen, prisms are Bak-4, and the lens are fully multi-coated.Center focus binoculars are not usually water proofed and filled with nitrogen. You achieve focus with a center focus wheel and the right eye piece for the right eye. For a good center focus binocular make sure the prisms are Bak-4 and the lens are fully multicoated.
Note that most 15x, 20x or 25x binoculars can still be used without a tripod for short periods of time. A tripod is recommended if you want to use them for longer periods of time or if you choose to buy the larger and heavier models. Remember that high magnification will allow you to see further and in more detail. The downside is that with higher magnification usually comes a narrower field of view and a less stable image.
Why do people even consider astronomy binoculars? When first getting interested in astronomy or searching for a gift for a young person, don't we usually ask "What kind of telescope shall I buy?" Of course, there are many different kinds of telescopes available from sources such as discount, hobby and department stores and usually each promises extraordinary celestial views.

Whether you’re bird watching, hunting, or even just taking an exploratory hike in the wilderness, a good pair of binoculars is one of the most useful things you can bring along with you. Though they’re not immediately thought of as a necessity by those who don’t have a direct need for them, binoculars can provide some true entertainment and fascination in the outdoors. If the fishing is slow, for example, checking out the herons across the lake or scanning the treetops for hawks is a great way to pass the time waiting for a bite. But in order to use them for situations like the above, you first have a pair. And, as with anything else, you should always research binoculars before you buy them. Read on for an elementary guide to binoculars for the outdoors.
Despite their popularity, the way binoculars work, what makes one better (or different) than another, and what all the numbers mean, are still rather mysterious to many prospective buyers. Read on and find out all you need to know about the ubiquitous binocular before making your choice so you can be sure you’re choosing the right one for whatever you’re planning on viewing.
The first decision a birder needs to make when buying binoculars is what magnification binoculars to get. When looking at binoculars on the Web (and on the box and the binoculars themselves) you will usually see two prominent numbers. These refer to the magnification and objective diameter. An example is: 8x42. This indicates the magnification of the binoculars is 8x power and the objective (front) lens is 42mm in diameter.

Accuracy. No matter how experienced you are in hunting, you can only come out with a ‘rough estimation’ of the distance of a prey. Rough estimation often means the accuracy of the measured distance is pretty much skewed. I am not trying to undermine experienced hunters but it’s normal that manual calculations are susceptible to human error. What more if you are an absolute beginner?


As one of the safest, easiest, and most environmentally friendly hobbies in existence, birdwatching brings together people of all age groups through a common love of wildlife. Birdwatching can be done practically anywhere, though avid hobbyists won’t hesitate to travel the world in search of the rarest species of birds. A good set of binoculars is the most important piece of equipment involved in birding, and buying the perfect pair is worth an investment in time.
The Leupold Shadow Gray 6x30 BX-1 Yosemite Binocular features a compact form-factor outfitted with traditional BAK4 Porro prisms and a fully multi-coated optical path to display more depth of field than similar roof prism designs. The resulting images transmitted by the Yosemite binocular have lifelike depth and are crisp and clear with high-contrast and accurate colors across the field of view.

The full rubber coating will protect the binoculars in any conditions, making them an extremely versatile tool for hiking, hunting, boating, and travel. Exceptionally crafted, the Armasight Binoculars offer compass-enhanced rangefinding and optical zoom in a finely tuned fashion. It is a joy to use this product, and we loved how high-quality this it feels.
Weighing at 34.7 ounces, it is not the lightest of the lot. You might feel a bit fatigued after carrying it for a longer time period. But it has long-range capabilities which outweigh this aspect. The range is estimated to be from 10 to around 2000 yards, which is much more than a mile. The binocular has a micro sd card slot which can be used to feed the ballistic information. Having a field of view of about 374 feet per 1000 yards, it is one of the biggest you will come across. The range and field of view go hand in hand to deliver you the view of a much larger area through the binocular, something which most of the rangefinder binoculars cannot offer. This will easily make you forget the weight of the device.

The idea of purchasing a rangefinder binocular is to observe things which are far. So it is ideal to have the maximum range for the rangefinder binocular you purchase. With the increase in magnification, you get an increase in range. Choose the kind of magnification which would suit you the most. If the range you want from your rangefinder binocular is less, then you do not have to go for one with higher magnification. Also, in cases such as bird watching, people need rangefinder binoculars which can have great minimum range. They would be using the binocular for closely watching birds in the nearby tree branches. So the minimum Focus distance has to be less than the distance between the person and the tree. So, keep both these aspects in mind.

This might seem like an odd thing to consider, since the whole idea of a binocular is to look at things that are far away; and for most users this is absolutely true. However, there are a fair number of enthusiasts who use their binocular for bird watching or insect observation. Many bird watchers like to have a close minimum focus distance that can allow them to see minute detail of birds—like wing bars, beak shape, or crown markings—while birds are feeding. A close focus of less than 6' for a full-size binocular is noteworthy. Typically, as magnification is increased, the minimum focus distance also increases. For users interested in a short close-focus distance, they should look at larger objectives and keep the magnification at around 8x.


Curious about those singing summer nester you keep hearing in the trees? Trying to scout out some new routes from afar? We purchased 16 of the best binoculars on the market then brought them birding, backpacking, and bushwacking, all to find the perfect pair for your next outing. Binoculars can be somewhat confusing with 100's of nearly identical looking models only differentiated by arcane specifications and vague claims of crystal clear images. We're here to cut through the confusion with our side-by-side testing results. Whether you're an aspiring bird nerd, prepping for a once in a lifetime safari, or want to be able to take a closer look at the cool things you see along the trail, we can guide you to the right pair of bins.
As you can expect from Swarovski, the optics are above par. It has SwaroBright, an integrated diopter, and a locking center focus. Even the external features of the FieldPro Package have been meticulously executed. That’s what you can expect from Swarovski – meticulous attention to detail. You’ll see it all through the glass when you peer through them. There’s no going back once you’ve found yourself seduced by the sexy El Range!
This is a supersized binocular suited to glassing distant targets for long periods of time. The double-hinge design creates a nice space for hands to hold it, but you will probably want to mount this 3-pound Leupold on a tripod. The mounting bracket is smartly located on the inside hinge of the Leupold (see Innovations, right). Hits: tight controls, the battleship-gray armor, the webby texture that wraps the aluminum-alloy chassis, and the first-rate carry case and neck strap. Misses: disappointing resolution and image quality.
"Bought these to replace older Nikon Sportstar II compact binoculars (similar price range), which fogged up on a damp river trip leaving poor image quality. I wear eyeglasses, and I could never get a full field of view with the Nikons due their short eye relief even with the eye cups folded down. The edges were always indistinct and blurry. The Pentax has longer eye relief and eye cups that quickly telescope out for spectacles-free viewing, and retract for eyeglass wearers. Way better than chintzy fold-down eyecups. With the Pentax I get the full, clear field of view with sharp edges."
I too am shopping for a pair of binoculars for my husband for Christmas. We live in a condominium building overlooking Lake Superior and he likes to look at the cargo ships coming in and out and the different boats on the water. I am thinking something 10x or 10-30x. We would probably just keep it mounted on a tripod if I bought a heavier set, but would prefer something lighter. 

In the past i have paid $100 ( when that was a lot of money) for binoculars that were no better than these. Great buy for $37. Once you get used to how they work they are excellent for watching Bald Eagles and other raptors in Cape May Point lighthouse sanctuary. Small enough to keep in the car, and if they get broken, well, it's only $37 so I'll pick up another pair.
Whilst both telescopes and astro binoculars are designed to give you a better view of the heavens at night, they both have their unique advantages and disadvantages and thus the best option will vary depending on your requirements at that moment. It is because of this, most people that a very interested in astronomy and practice it a lot, will posses at least one telescope AND a pair of bins.

Efficiency is the word which can describe this product. Bushnell know for their high-quality products have come up with a rangefinder binocular which is going to be one of the rangefinders on which the coming generation will be modeled on. It is a model which blends the quality of binoculars which the capabilities of the laser rangefinder. Starting with the range, it can measure from 10 to 1760 yards. It operates on a push of a button. The ease of use with this product is unbelievable. It is used for multiple activities such as hunting, outdoor sports, bird and wildlife watching, traveling, and even by the army. It is a multi-purpose rangefinder binocular which is made using high-quality materials.
For high magnification binoculars and those with an effective objective lens diameter over 50mm, we recommend the use of a tripod to stabilize the binoculars for viewing, as they may cause unstable image and uncomfortable viewing due to shaking by hand movement. This is also a convenient method for steadying your field of vision for extended viewing.
Seek out fellow birdwatchers and ask their thoughts. Birding clubs are all over the Internet—and they take their hobby seriously. Find a club or message board devoted to birding, and load up on questions to ask. You may get varied opinions on different products, but the insight should provide you with an expanded knowledge base when it comes time to make your selection.
With an eye relief of 20 mm and 8.5×42 magnification, this rangefinder binocular is the perfect fit for those wearing glasses. This is because it offers a lot of places for you to adjust behind the lens while wearing glasses. The focus wheel is placed perfectly where your hands can comfortably handle it. The dioptre adjustment is incorporated with the focusing wheel. This lets you to simply pull back the wheel and turn it to change the dioptre scale.

The biggest drawback of the DiamondBack 8x28 are the 28mm objective lenses. While the glass is good enough to produce surprisingly bright daytime images, the sheer lack of lens size means that dusk, dawn, and other lowlight viewing situations will dampen the image. This isn't a big deal for large subjects (like deer, or lions if you're lucky) but small birds can quickly start looking more like silhouettes. Also, the close focus range of 13.1 feet means you won't be able to get nearby butterflies in focus. Overall these things feel like small tradeoffs for a sub-$200 price point and sub-pound weight.


The natural tendency for most people new to binoculars is to get the most powerful binoculars they can find. After all, the idea is that you want to get a view as close to the bird as possible. However, there is a drawback to high-powered viewing: image shake. The higher the magnification, the more small movements and vibrations will be translated into your image. Also, high magnification usually has an impact on minimum focus distance (more on why that is important later) and it also narrows your field of view.
Here again, both of our Best Buy winners impressed, earning scores of 7 out of 10 for brightness. Both the Vortex Diamondback 8x28 and the Celestra Nature DX 8x42 produced exceptionally bright images when we used them midday in good light. Both models did struggle a bit in low-light situations, however. Many early morning birds lacked some color and looked more like silhouettes until the sun got a bit higher.

Astronomy is done in the dark, so you really want big aperture: big front lenses. These collect lots of light so you can see fainter things. This doesn't matter so much in the daytime, when there's plenty of light and you can get by with small front lenses — allowing daytime binoculars to be smaller, lighter, and less expensive. But for binoculars for astronomy, the bigger the aperture the better.
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