However instead of just doing what most other guides and review sites do and just list a bunch of instruments for you to choose from, claiming that they are all the best, in this guide I will go over in detail what you need to look for and how you can go about choosing the best pair for your particular needs and budget as well as offer some recommendations based on the binos that I have actually fully tested and reviewed.


Secondly, the argon-purged chamber helps protect the binoculars against water damage and prevents fogging, one of the most common issues with binoculars. And third, the company backs their bins with a lifetime replacement warranty against defects and lifetime no-cost repairs if you damage them by accident during normal use. And as any avid bird watcher can tell you, frequent normal use will eventually lead to damage.
The Celestron TrailSeeker binoculars are great for gathering light and delivering fantastic optical resolution with their 42mm lens and 8x magnification, the industry standard for a good pair of binoculars. While some of the image edges might suffer from blurring, these binoculars will still give you a wonderful and wide field of view for less than $200. And with their lightweight magnesium alloy body, you know you’re going to get something durable, waterproof, and high-quality for the outdoors or in a stadium setting.
All things considered, for a person who isn’t after the absolute top-of-the-range pair of binoculars, or for someone who’s just getting into them, you pretty much can’t go wrong with the USCAMEL 10×50 military binoculars. With their great build quality and weather resistance, as well as the optic clarity and additional functionality, they’ll do the job great.

Like every set of binoculars, astronomy binoculars will have two main features: magnification and the objective lens size. So for example, if the binoculars are 10×50 it means they have 10x magnification and 50mm objective lenses. The secret to choosing the perfect night time binoculars is getting the right balance between magnification and lens size that will result in a clear, bright and stable image.
If you are going to use your binoculars for astronomy and don't want the hassle of using a tripod, 7x50 binoculars are a classic size. In recent years the giant binoculars have captured the headlines, but these are still unbeatable for viewing really extended open clusters and nebulae and as far as astronomy binoculars go, nothing is easier to use than a 7x50.
The Hooway 7x50mm model is sort of your all-around tough and reliable set of rangefinder binos. The large, 50mm objective lenses are encased in non-slip rubber armor-making them shock-proof and water-proof. On the underside of the binos is a tripod adapter. A tripod may be ideal in situations where you are planning to remain in one spot for a long time.

Canon recently refreshed their line up of image-stabilized binoculars with new versions of their venerable 10×30 and 12×36 models. (They’ve also released three completely new binoculars utilizing a different image-stabilization mechanism: 10×32, 12×32, and 14×32, due out some time in November, 2017.) The 12×36s go from version II (reviewed here) to III, and the 10×30s are updated to version II. What are the differences and are the changes a reason to upgrade? To find out, I obtained a 10×30 IS II to evaluate. Continue reading “Review: Canon 10×30 IS II Image-Stabilized Binoculars”

There is an adage that goes "the best pair of binoculars is the one you use." If yours aren't comfortable to hold, carry, or look through then you aren't going to use them. Things like rubberized coatings on the barrels, indentations for your hands and thumbs, an open bridge, comfortable interpupillary distance, padded straps, adjustable eyecups, weight, size, and eye relief can all affect how comfortable a pair will be. All of these measurements are very subjective and will differ between individuals. For instance, not everyone's eyes are set the same distance apart, so everyone will be most comfortable with a slightly different interpupillary distance. The amount of eye relief can be a big concern for someone with glasses and of little concern to others.

Yet another reason binoculars are excellent for beginning astronomers is that using two eyes is quite simply better than using one. Not only does it help when finding objects, but using two eyes with Porro prism binoculars will provide a stunningly beautiful three-dimensional effect that is much more interesting and, yes, exciting than the flat, one-dimensional view typically seen through a telescope. Not only is the depth of the view noteworthy, but the width as well. You can find astronomy binoculars with 5-6° field of view while most telescopes are limited to a 1° view even at their lowest magnification.
What is good for us the consumers is that many of the new Chinese optics are now being made to very high optical standards and whilst many may not like to admit it, they perform as well as many far more expensive optics made in the west. Some popular brands include the Oberwerk which have plenty of nice features including collimation screws, Celestron's, Meade's and the excellent Apogee brand of binoculars. All of these offer fantastic quality for the price and bring giant binoculars within reach of most peoples budgets. (Take a look at this review on Cheap Binoculars for Astronomy)
Curious about those singing summer nester you keep hearing in the trees? Trying to scout out some new routes from afar? We purchased 16 of the best binoculars on the market then brought them birding, backpacking, and bushwacking, all to find the perfect pair for your next outing. Binoculars can be somewhat confusing with 100's of nearly identical looking models only differentiated by arcane specifications and vague claims of crystal clear images. We're here to cut through the confusion with our side-by-side testing results. Whether you're an aspiring bird nerd, prepping for a once in a lifetime safari, or want to be able to take a closer look at the cool things you see along the trail, we can guide you to the right pair of bins.
High-performance features include: fully multi-coated optics and BAK-4 prisms, and custom adjustment with center and right diopter focus knobs. They have an extra-large field of view with crystal clarity from edge to edge; Ultra-smooth center focus that's easy to operate, allowing you to pinpoint your subject, Right diopter adjustment so you can fine-tune your viewing.
A BAK-4 prism ensures crisp, clear images, and works very well in low-light conditions. Additionally, the multi-coated optics provide excellent light sensitivity and filtering throughout the lens system, making for great viewing even in low-light conditions. An excellent waterproof binocular rangefinder, the Barska Battalion is the perfect product for any outdoor situation.
If this japanese-made binocular looks European, that’s entirely intentional. It’s the first full-size bino from a new brand that hopes to marry European style and optical performance with retail prices achievable from the lower production costs of Asian partners. The Passion looks, feels, and performs like a higher-end European binocular. The machined aluminum eyecups are first-rate and the controls are tight and precise. The glass is excellent. The price is a bargain for an optic of this quality, especially considering the fully transferrable lifetime warranty.
Mercury and Venus. These are both inner planets.  They orbit the sun closer than Earth’s orbit.  And for that reason, both Mercury and Venus show phases as seen from Earth at certain times in their orbit – a few days before or after the planet passes between the sun and Earth.  At such times,  turn your binoculars on Mercury or Venus. Good optical quality helps here, but you should be able to see them in a crescent phase. Tip: Venus is so bright that its glare will overwhelm the view. Try looking in twilight instead of true darkness.
There are two separate categories that your binocular use can fall into. The first is bird watching and hunting. These activities generally require higher quality binoculars. Recommendations from the Audobon Birding Society call for binoculars that have a magnification of around 6 to 8 times for optimal bird viewing. Any higher, and you will likely have trouble locating animals in the scope, as you’ll lose points of reference when putting the binoculars up to your eyes. The same should be taken into account for hunting – where getting an animal in your binoculars’ viewing range quickly is paramount.
This is a rather challenging topic when it comes to discussing binoculars. They are typically heavy products and keeping them steady might be an issue. The problem is, the larger the magnification, the more difficult it is to get a clear image, as even the smallest vibrations can manifest as a shaky, unusable image. A popular option is to mount them on a tripod. But if you’re on a boat, or in a car, the fact that they’re moving will counteract the tripod’s effect and you’ll still get a shaky image.
Combine Nikon binocular performance with the extreme speed and ranging technology of a 1900-yard laser rangefinder and you have Laser Force, Nikon's 10x 42mm Rangefinder Binocular. Quite simply the single optic solution for serious hunters who depend on both their binocular for picking out distant animals and their rangefinder for getting the exact distance before taking the shot. Featuring ED (Extra-low Dispersion) glass and Nikon's ID Technology to compensate for incline or decline angles, Laser Force puts ranging precision, optical performance and rugged performance within your reach.
Whilst both telescopes and astro binoculars are designed to give you a better view of the heavens at night, they both have their unique advantages and disadvantages and thus the best option will vary depending on your requirements at that moment. It is because of this, most people that a very interested in astronomy and practice it a lot, will posses at least one telescope AND a pair of bins.
The construction is sturdy, ergonomic, and is easy to hold and operate. With 8X magnification and a 42mm lens diameter, the product delivers high-quality imagery thanks to Leica’s proprietary prism system. These binoculars are a fantastic, advanced tool for hunters and marksmen alike, who'll appreciate the Leica 8x42 Geovid's rugged construction and superior optics. It is a great addition to your gear.
Beyond those specific models, I would say look at a bino that's larger than 42mm up to 56mm - anything larger than that and they're going to be heavy and awkward to use. I'd also keep the magnification at around 7x-8x - that will ensure a large exit pupil (especially with the bigger objective models) and will help offset the dimming of the view that can happen to high-power optics especially in challenging light. Here's a link to some search results that can help you narrow your choices. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?setNs=p_PRICE_2%7c1&Ns=p_PRICE_2%7c1&ci=1010&fct=fct_magnification_156%7c7x%2bfct_magnification_156%7c8x%2bfct_objective-lens-diameter_1126%7c50mm%2bfct_objective...
These Vortex are really nice, with phase-corrected prisms to keep images sharp and colors accurate, and wide angles of view. They're water and fogproof also, so they'll stand up to inclement weather great. I also like the mid-sized 42mm objectives which will give them good low-light capabilities when a lot of game . https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1200179-REG/vortex_db_204_8x42_diamondback_binocular_green_black.html
You can also look in on the gray blotches on the moon called maria, named when early astronomers thought these lunar features were seas.  The maria are not seas, of course, and instead they’re now thought to have formed 3.5 billion years ago when asteroid-sized rocks hit the moon so hard that lava percolated up through cracks in the lunar crust and flooded the impact basins. These lava plains cooled and eventually formed the gray seas we see today.

Telescopes are big. Even little ones are bigger, heavier and longer than most binoculars. So telescopes need to sit on tripods or rocker-boxes for stability. A hand-held spyglass might have been good enough for Captain Kidd, but every modern navy uses binoculars. Angling a long tube up toward the sky makes the shake problem even worse; your extended arm wiggles the front objective lens. Binoculars can lock in tightly to both your eye sockets and your hands are close in to your face for more stability. [Related: Best Telescopes for Beginner: A Buying Guide]
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