The field of view relates to the width of your image. For astronomers, this means the amount of sky you can capture when aiming your binoculars to the stars. The wider the field of view the more sky you can cover. Powerful, high magnification, binoculars will often have a narrower field of view and vice versa. Good astronomy binoculars will have both – a good magnification and a wide field of view.
Build quality is another one of those crucial areas when it comes to a precision optical system. High performance optics require painstaking manufacture within extremely tight tolerance limits to deliver consistent levels of quality in the finished product. The slightest misalignment of any component in the construction can seriously affect the performance of the binocular.
We hope potential buyers use this information to their advantage to learn about and decide upon the model that is best for their needs. Preparing this information by conducting research on each model and comparing it to others, we’ve created these rangefinder binocular reviews. Our research involves testing the units optical performance, accuracy, ranging abilities, ballistics, ergonomics and more.
Field of view is measured at a thousand yard distance because you'll only really notice a difference when looking far into the distance. So if you're looking for bins to scope out lines on a distant ridge, you'll probably appreciate a wider field of view. If you're using binoculars to watch wildlife, which will generally be within a couple hundred feet of you, you probably won't be able to notice the difference between a 300 foot and 450 foot field of view, as the difference will be negligible at that distance.

That isn't to say that any of the bins we tested were poorly constructed. We didn't find any bargain basement bins that could make the cut for inclusion in our review, so all have a dcent base level of construction quality. Sure, minor things like the more plasticky rubber coating of the Celestron Nature DX or the stiff hinge of the Ahtlon Midas makes them feel a bit less engineered than other models, they can still certainly stand up to some rigorous use.

Telescopes are big. Even little ones are bigger, heavier and longer than most binoculars. So telescopes need to sit on tripods or rocker-boxes for stability. A hand-held spyglass might have been good enough for Captain Kidd, but every modern navy uses binoculars. Angling a long tube up toward the sky makes the shake problem even worse; your extended arm wiggles the front objective lens. Binoculars can lock in tightly to both your eye sockets and your hands are close in to your face for more stability. [Related: Best Telescopes for Beginner: A Buying Guide]
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