Age is the single most important factor in choosing a pair of binoculars. Although with age a person’s exit pupil tends to get smaller; that is, 5mm after age 50, one should determine his or her exit pupil. This is usually done by trial and error. If you do it in the dark, you cannot see what you are doing when holding up a millimeter ruler to your eye in front of a mirror. You can try a dimly lit room however. Sky Publishing use to sell a device for measuring one’s exit pupil.Another factor affecting your exit pupil is your observing environment. If you observe from the city or the suburbs, light pollution will affect your exit pupil and will not allow it to fully dilate as if you were under a country sky. For instance, if you observe with a 7 x 50 pair of binoculars under a city sky, this is like observing with a pair of 7 x 35 binoculars. Why? Because your pupil is not fully dilated to take advantage of the extra exit pupil or circle of light being projected by the 7 x 50 binoculars. What is the exit pupil of a 7 x 50 binocular? Answer. 7.1mm. Divide 50mm the aperture of the binocular
Combining excellent optical performance with ruggedness, portability, and comfort, the Diamondback 8x42 Binocular from Vortex Optics is ideal to take along on hiking trips, camping, traveling, or just in case. The optics feature improved transmission, contrast, and true color using fully multi-coated lenses and phase-corrected roof prisms. With the improved close focus of 5' you will get plenty of focusing range and a sharp focus on faraway scenery as well as close-ups of nearby street signs, monuments' details, or wildlife. The combination of 8x magnification and the 42mm objectives offers you a generous 60° angle of view that gives you complete images of targets.

So, what exactly makes good binoculars? Binoculars’ optics consist of three main components that affect their performance: the ocular lenses (in the eyepiece), the objective lenses (the lenses that are farthest away from your face), and the prism, which we’ll discuss further in a bit. The ocular lens is a magnifier. So when you see binoculars’ specifications, the first number signifies how much that lens enlarges what you’re looking at. In the case of all the models we tested, that number is an eight, so you’re getting an image size eight times larger than you see with the naked eye. The objective lens gathers light; its related number—in our case, 42—indicates the diameter of that lens in millimeters. The bigger the lens, the more light it can gather.


Combined Unit: Having binoculars and a rangefinder in one tool is very convenient, but it can be considered just as much of a drawback should something go wrong. Should the device end up lost, damaged or stolen, it would be equivalent to having two devices compromised at the same time. It would be best to carry at least one backup device to stay on the safe side.
The Pentax AD’s weight is feather-light, at 9.6 ounces (less than half the 25-ounce weight of the Athlon Midas 8×42 binoculars, our top full-size pick). All compacts—in particular the high-magnification ones—are prone to “tunnel vision” due to a narrow field of view that makes it hard to find a distant target through the lens. Optically, the Pentax AD compacts have a wider field of view than some of the other compacts we tested, and the colors on birds, flowers, and butterflies appeared just as bright under normal conditions.
Bought these items for a family member for hunting. First impressions are wow these things are great. They feel good in the hand a little heavy but expected that from a cheap pair of binoculars. Then started to use and found out they are great products. My brother and I used them over the weekend for hunting coyotes in western Utah. During the hunt the weather went from rain to snow to sun, and I can say that these had no issues at all. The lenses stayed clear and focusing was almost as good as my vortex binos that I paid 5x more for. carying case is a little hokey but nothing that a good bino holster cant fix. All in all I am glad that my brother was happy with his present and we were able to test them in 3 types of weather. I hope they stand up to the test of time. Worth the investment of 32.99.

Ranging Performance: The ranging performance describes how far a model can accurately range a target. The maximum range listed by the manufacturer is the farthest the model can return accurate results under ideal conditions. This is important because it makes up half of the purpose of the device, and different hunting styles require different maximum ranges.


The lightweight housing is nitrogen-filled and O-ring sealed, enabling it to withstand use in wet and snowy weather without fogging when going from extreme temperature changes, and the rubberized armor offers protection from impacts while providing a slip-resistant grip. The Atrek's single-hinge closed-bridge design facilitates easy one-handed use, while the center focus wheel enables fast focusing. Twist-up eyecups makes it comfortable to use with or without eyewear.
A: There is no single answer to this question. Here are a few things to keep in mind. If you will not be able to get close up to your subject, a higher magnification is better like 10x or 12x. Keep in mind the higher the magnification the more “shake” you will get and a tripod will help out greatly. If you are just looking out your back window at a bird feeder, a 6 or 8x magnification should be sufficient.
We hope potential buyers use this information to their advantage to learn about and decide upon the model that is best for their needs. Preparing this information by conducting research on each model and comparing it to others, we’ve created these rangefinder binocular reviews. Our research involves testing the units optical performance, accuracy, ranging abilities, ballistics, ergonomics and more.
Despite their popularity, the way binoculars work, what makes one better (or different) than another, and what all the numbers mean, are still rather mysterious to many prospective buyers. Read on and find out all you need to know about the ubiquitous binocular before making your choice so you can be sure you’re choosing the right one for whatever you’re planning on viewing.
Best for City Birding: As bad as it sounds, rising at 5:00 a.m. has its rewards. Even on a murky spring day, the sky can have a surreal spark. Our resident downy woodpecker, an outlier camped among cardinals and chickadees, begins to lope and scamper in the breeze, tracing a parabolic line from trunk to trunk. We also have some nuthatches, goldfinches, titmice, and very occasionally a yellow-bellied sapsucker. We’re up high, third floor, facing east and west, a real hierarchy of light. Sometimes the morning sun is so enormous it’s as if a great fire is swallowing Back Bay, precisely the kind of place that requires a huge field of view, and the Diamondback has the largest of its class: 420 feet at 1,000 yards.

Colour fidelity: its important that wildlife and birding binoculars reproduce colours and tones accurately. For birding in particular correct identification can depend on differentiating between subtle variations in hue. Many binoculars have a subtle colour cast. The view through them is either slightly cool (bluish) or slightly warm (yellowish) compared to the view through the naked eye. This isn’t necessarily a problem as long as it’s not pronounced — but look for a binocular that’s as close to neutral colour reproduction as you can get.

I know that some museums, like the Louvre or Musee d'Orsay, are well lit - while some parts of Versailles, cathedrals and churches like the Sistine Chapel - are a bit dim (almost dark)...so if you can handle a bino larger than a compact (up to 25mm objective lens diameter) you may want to think about upping the size to a 30-40mm to help make the view brighter if you know the rooms will have challenging lighting.
"Bought these to replace older Nikon Sportstar II compact binoculars (similar price range), which fogged up on a damp river trip leaving poor image quality. I wear eyeglasses, and I could never get a full field of view with the Nikons due their short eye relief even with the eye cups folded down. The edges were always indistinct and blurry. The Pentax has longer eye relief and eye cups that quickly telescope out for spectacles-free viewing, and retract for eyeglass wearers. Way better than chintzy fold-down eyecups. With the Pentax I get the full, clear field of view with sharp edges."
Optics4Birding is your one-stop source for quality binoculars, spotting scopes, and related products. Our site features comprehensive binocular reviews, spotting scope reviews and other product reviews. Informative sections tell you how to choose binoculars, how binoculars and spotting scopes work, about digiscoping, caring for your optics, about night vision and much more.
Bucking the trend, Walker Golder, Deputy Director of Audubon North Carolina, is a shore-bird specialist who uses an old pair of Leica 8x32 binoculars. For closer views, he switches to a spotting scope, but the 8x32s are, according to him, “small enough for me to put around my neck and they don’t get in the way as I move and get in and out of boats.” He generally recommends 10x for shorebird viewing for others.
Granted, most of the interesting astronomical objects that binoculars can show will appear very faint in them. But most objects that a telescope will show also appear very faint in it — certainly much fainter than you would like. Moreover, the map-using skills that you'll gain using binoculars to hunt out these dim, distant things in the dark wilds overhead are exactly the skills that you will need in order to put a telescope to good use.
One aspect of binoculars often overlooked by birders is minimum focusing distance (or close focus). The binocular brings the distant bird visually closer to the birder for observation and analysis, but the Audubon Society’s Eric Lind is quick to point out that birding can easily involve looking closely at birds and insects that are relatively close to the observer. Having a close minimum focusing distance might give you an amazing close-up view of that feeding hummingbird or majestic butterfly. Binoculars with higher magnification will, in general, have longer minimum focus distances.

10x42 is a nice utilitarian size, but some may find them a bit large/heavy for general sightseeing as they may cause neck strain when worn around the neck while walking around town or in the woods. I'll give some recommendations, for that size - but you may want to consider some other sizes. An 8x42 drops the magnification down a bit, but you generally get a larger field of view, wider exit pupil, and usually a longer eye relief so they are a little better for sightseeing. Additionally, you may want to go with a smaller objective such as a 30-32mm, which will shave considerable ounces off the weight and inches off the size to make it easier to pack and carry...for smaller models like this, I'd stay at the 8x power to maximize image brightness, field of view, and exit pupil. With that being said, here are my recommendations:


Barska's Battallion is a set of rangefinding binoculars that are sturdily made, offer fantastic optics, and can be bought at a great price. The rugged magnesium and aluminum frame is covered with a rubber coating for advanced shock resistance and optics protection. Offering an internal rangefinder with built-in compass, the binoculars provide great 8X magnification with a 30mm lens diameter.
AWESOME! These Binoculars are really great especially for a beginner night sky watcher like myself. They were easy to start using and I am really enjoying them. While I hope to eventually graduate to a telescope, for someone who is just starting out, these are fantastic and are a great bang for the buck as well. I would definately recommend these to any amateur sky gazer.

Their build quality is good which is actually a bit surprising, as many manufacturers’ first place for cutting corners when they want to save money is build quality. Fortunately, BARSKA decided to go against that, and you have an ergonomic, non-slip grip which won’t fall out of your hand. The rubber armor is shockproof and heavy duty and will hold in various rough conditions. Another great thing while we’re discussing the build quality is that the binoculars are floating, and even if you do manage to drop them in the water, they’ll stay on the surface, making them easy to find. Like you’d expect, they’re fully waterproof, and sealed with O-rings. They are also filled with nitrogen, which means they won’t fog up or get damaged by moisture, regardless of the weather conditions. By now this might be a common sighting with binoculars of this class, but you don’t notice how useful it is until you’ve had to use a pair that doesn’t have that kind of protection.
The true renaissance of astronomy began when Nicholaus Copernicus proposed that the sun was at the center of the universe in the 16th century C.E. Less than 100 years later, Johannes Kepler introduced the Three Laws of Planetary Motion. Around the same time, Galileo was beginning his study of celestial beings with the aid of a telescope, leading him to discover Jupiter's four brightest moons. Astronomers have continued to make great strides in our understanding of the universe, discovering the first planets outside of our Solar System as recently as 1991.
Dielectric high-reflective multilayer prism coating: I thought it was important to mention this type of coating precisely because it’s found on Roof style binoculars on the prism and is a great coating to have. It can achieve light reflectance that exceeds 99%, which means better and brighter images! Normally this coating is found on higher end binoculars.
I'd like to get a binocular for my wife who is legally blind and has also some degree of night blindness. We travel extensively and she loves watching nature (animals on safaris; mountains; etc.). I was thinking that a binocular with a large aperture and wide field might be a good choice, such as the Steiner 8x56 ShadowQuest Binocular. I like the good performance during dawn, becasue of my wife's impaired ability to see in low-light environments. What do you think? Any other types I should consider?
Choosing the right binoculars with rangefinder function will depend upon each user’s circumstances. Some users value certain aspects more than others. The ability to view distant targets may be a top priority, so a unit with great optics may be most important. Other users need extremely accurate distances to targets and game, so the rangefinder aspect will be paramount.
Another recent innovation is image-stabilized binoculars. These employ the same ingenious mechanisms found inside the best video cameras. Push a button and the shaky magnified view suddenly calms down, almost freezing in place. The result is that you can use higher magnifications, get away with slightly less aperture, and yet still see more than with conventional binoculars.

Is there a best binocular for astronomy? We could point you to one of the best in the Fujinon 25X150 MT or it's sibling with 40X magnification. They both have terrific optics, but neither will do any good if it's not used. Your OpticsReviewer proposes that, aside from ensuring you have fundamentally good optics in good housings, the best astronomy binoculars are the ones that are used and help a person to learn more about the celestial bodies around this globe.
The main downside to these bins is the price. A list price of $750 is pretty hefty. Plus, you can get brighter optics for less (like the Viper HD) if you're willing to deal with the weight of a full-sized pair of binoculars. But, if you want quality optics in the most portable package possible and are willing to pay for it, the Leica 10x25 Ultravid is the cream of the crop.

AWESOME! These Binoculars are really great especially for a beginner night sky watcher like myself. They were easy to start using and I am really enjoying them. While I hope to eventually graduate to a telescope, for someone who is just starting out, these are fantastic and are a great bang for the buck as well. I would definately recommend these to any amateur sky gazer.
The focus adjustment is pretty easy and accurate. You will also find there’s an on-board compass. If you calibrate it properly, it’s accurate as well, and during something like a sailboat trip, you’ll love the fact that it’s there. The distance measurement is another great addition, and even at this price point, it is fairly accurate. You will undoubtedly find it useful for things such as birdwatching or wildlife exploration and, both the rangefinder scale and compass have an illumination switch, which is useful in darker and overcast situations.
Hopefully you found the information included above to be useful. You can use all of the information to streamline your decision-making process as to whether or not you want to purchase rangefinder binoculars, and also use it to better educate yourself about this technology – as well as others. They are definitely incredible tools, but may or may not be useful in your specific circumstance or situation.
Check the eye relief. Most binoculars have eyecups that retract to accommodate eyeglass wearers or extend to provide shading for those without. Look for durable, multi-adjustable eyecups. If you wear glasses, adjust the eyecups to their minimum position and make sure there’s enough eye relief—you shouldn’t see black rings around the image. Our Eyeglass Friendliness score helps indicate this.
“I am SO thrilled with my new binoculars! I ordered the Compact 8x32s. I’d call them semi-compact. Bigger (and much higher quality) than my super-compact pocket ones and yet perfect to take along in a bag or on a belt. I’ve had them a week and I’ve gotten familiar with them and had a chance to use them as well. They look great AND they show things at a distance well, crisp! They are comfortable to hold with an indentation in the nonslip finish for each thumb. I have a problem with the finish on, and eye cups of, many binoculars as most are latex. But these don’t smell like tires and they don’t bother me. In the center, they adjust to the width between the eyes. And they have a right eye diopter which allows for the difference between most people’s eyes.”
the quality of these binoculars is very good and the images are collimated correctly and very sharp.although the length is definitely an improvement over the giant style binoculars they’re still rather large and do require a tripod for steady viewing.my intention is to use these both for viewing wildlife in the daytime and the night sky. So far I’m very pleased.
Obviously, early technology was nowhere near as accurate as modern day technology is (is likely that technology will continue to advance in the future), but you should still be able to get a fantastically accurate reading every single time you bring a pair of rangefinders up to your eyes. There are definitely some limitations to this technology, however.
Meteor showers offer a practical example. You never know exactly where the next bright streak will appear. Yes, you're pretty sure it will come from the "radiant." That’s the name of a constellation (usually) whose location on the sky roughly corresponds to the cloud of cosmic crap into which Earth is plowing to create the shower. [Example: The Leonid meteor shower in November appears to come from the direction of Leo.]
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