Highly rated (above 4 stars from more than 5000 satisfied customers on Amazon only) Skymaster 15X70 binoculars are the preferred choice of any seasoned astronomer. A large objective lens of 70mm with multi coated optics provides a brighter and sharper view of further celestial objects like nebulae, galaxies (Andromeda, M81, M82, M44, M50, etc.), star clusters, and the moons around Jupiter.
    The UpClose G2 8x21 Roof Binocular from Celestron is a light weight 8 ounces with a closed hinged bridge design. At less than 4 inches they are a prime candidate for an easily mobile binocular that leaves no excuse to be caught without some magnification for that surprise situation. The water resistant, rubber covered, aluminum body adds an added level of worry free use from too much rough handling and never too much use. The sure grip furnished by thumb indents and finger ridges are a welcome feature allowing a firm non-slip hold. Just another reason to make sure that this binocular gets taken along.

Rangefinders are an important part of your hunting or sporting routine. It is a device which allows you to measure the distance between you and the target. On the other hand, binoculars are the device which is used to observe objects which are further away from us. When these devices were combined to make a binocular which can also show the range between you and the object, it resulted in the manufacture of rangefinder binoculars. Rangefinder binoculars are extremely handy because of the ease of use and the features it has.
Oculus packs a number of premium features in this compact, hand-filling 42mm binocular, including a tripod adapter, thumb detents on the underside of the barrels, a very precise clicking diopter control, and a cushioned nylon case. The optics, delivered through “ultra high-definition” glass inside the magnesium-alloy chassis, are solid, finishing in the middle of our full-size field. Our quibble is with the controls. The closed center hinge is so stiff it takes some serious work to spread the barrels, and the focus wheel is spongy.
Combine Nikon binocular performance with the extreme speed and ranging technology of a 1900-yard laser rangefinder and you have LaserForce, Nikon’s 10x42 Rangefinder Binocular. Quite simply the single optic solution for serious hunters who depend on both their binocular for picking out distant animals and their rangefinder for getting the exact distance before taking the shot.
Measuring only 5 ½ inches long, this new Nikon delivers a lot of optical horsepower in a compact and lightweight package. And what an elegant package it is. The Monarch HG has a number of stylistic features that reminded us of the last premium Nikon binocular: the EDG. There’s the pebbled-­rubber armor, the finely turned eyecups, and the Euro-style metal objective lens rings. The Monarch delivers an image on par with the premium furnishings. The “field-­flattener” lenses widen the field of view and reduce peripheral distortion.
The good news is that the true technological improvements in binoculars over the past few years have come not in gimmicky features, but optics. Whereas 20 years ago you might have needed to spend $500 to get decent, waterproof binoculars from a factory in the Midwest, now the recent manufacturing boom in China has brought us increasingly cheaper versions of familiar products, resulting in a crush of nearly identical binoculars—more than 2,000 models right now on Amazon, for example—most of them featuring similar designs.

Best Deal: I beat the living shit out of these poor things on a five-day camping trip in western North Dakota (inadvertently, of course). To start, I nearly dropped them in a prairie-dog burrow. Then they went straight into the Little Missouri River and came out as good as new (like most binoculars these days, the Monarch’s multi-coated lenses are impervious to water and fog). At a low point, I considered using them to prop up my shaky camp stove, but thought again. I could’ve done slightly better on size and weight with the Leicas or Mavens, but on durability? I doubt it.
Ranging Performance: The ranging performance describes how far a model can accurately range a target. The maximum range listed by the manufacturer is the farthest the model can return accurate results under ideal conditions. This is important because it makes up half of the purpose of the device, and different hunting styles require different maximum ranges.
Another feature we deemed essential was proper functioning for users with glasses. Your binoculars work only when the proper distance between your eye and the binoculars’ ocular lens (the lens on the eyepiece end) is maintained. Glasses would increase that distance if you didn’t have a way to adjust the inboard or outboard position of the ocular lens. This feature is called eye relief, and the standard recommendation is that those who wear glasses need a minimum of 15 mm of adjustability. Old-fashioned eye relief meant a pair of rubber cups that rolled down to bring your glasses to the proper distance; those cups are still found on some binoculars, but we don’t recommend them, because they’ll eventually stiffen or even tear. Preferable are eyepieces that twist downward into a more compact position, a feature that all of our picks have.
Binoculars get beat up and dusty, and cheap ones go out of alignment in a few weeks or with a good knock, resulting in double vision or blurry patches. For the record, I accidentally dropped the Athlon Midas ED binoculars onto a dirt road in Mexico (right onto the focus knob!), brushed them off and found they worked just fine. Nearly all companies I was able to reach offer a full, transferable, lifetime warranty of the “you can drive over it with a truck” type, but I recommend researching warranties before buying any model, because their details may change in the future.
Barska's Battallion is a set of rangefinding binoculars that are sturdily made, offer fantastic optics, and can be bought at a great price. The rugged magnesium and aluminum frame is covered with a rubber coating for advanced shock resistance and optics protection. Offering an internal rangefinder with built-in compass, the binoculars provide great 8X magnification with a 30mm lens diameter.
With binoculars at this level they are offering as much as top-quality telescopes and will bring galaxies and deep-sky objects into view. They have BaK-4 prisms and multi-coated optics as well as individual eyepiece focus to ensure optimal focus position. The body of these Celestron binoculars is water-resistant and they come in a padded carrying case for travel and safe storage.
Low Cost, Good Performance - Both the Bushnell Fusion and the Snypex Knight LRF offer some excellent value for money. Sure they may not match the higher end instruments in every area, but make no mistake these are still both more than capable rangers and optics in their own right and will provide those on a tighter budget with an instrument that they can use with confidence in all conditions.
As a more general comment on the current state of binocular manufacturing: With things changing so rapidly, consumers should check that the pair they end up with is the same high-quality model we’ve tested. So many new binocular brands and models are in the market now, and some confusion is inevitable. Athlon Optics, a relatively new company, currently has 28 different models and six distinct binocular lines. If you’re the kind of person who prefers the stability (and availability) of a better-known brand, look toward our runner-up and budget picks.

Binoculars come in two basic designs based on the type of prism used in their optical construction — the traditional porr0-prism design and the more modern roof-prism design. Until relatively recently porro-prisms were by far the most common type of binocular on the market. However as the prices for high-quality roof-prism design has come down their popularity has increased.
There is an adage that goes "the best pair of binoculars is the one you use." If yours aren't comfortable to hold, carry, or look through then you aren't going to use them. Things like rubberized coatings on the barrels, indentations for your hands and thumbs, an open bridge, comfortable interpupillary distance, padded straps, adjustable eyecups, weight, size, and eye relief can all affect how comfortable a pair will be. All of these measurements are very subjective and will differ between individuals. For instance, not everyone's eyes are set the same distance apart, so everyone will be most comfortable with a slightly different interpupillary distance. The amount of eye relief can be a big concern for someone with glasses and of little concern to others.
Not all birding is done on sunny days. You will definitely want a pair of binoculars that is waterproof, as even fair-weather birders might get stuck in a passing rain shower from time to time. Fogproof is also a good feature to look for, as this will keep your binoculars from fogging up when transitioning to the outdoors on a cold day from a warm living room, where you were just perusing the latest Audubon magazine or Sibley guide.
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Whether you’re bird watching, hunting, or even just taking an exploratory hike in the wilderness, a good pair of binoculars is one of the most useful things you can bring along with you. Though they’re not immediately thought of as a necessity by those who don’t have a direct need for them, binoculars can provide some true entertainment and fascination in the outdoors. If the fishing is slow, for example, checking out the herons across the lake or scanning the treetops for hawks is a great way to pass the time waiting for a bite. But in order to use them for situations like the above, you first have a pair. And, as with anything else, you should always research binoculars before you buy them. Read on for an elementary guide to binoculars for the outdoors.
Ranging Performance: The ranging performance describes how far a model can accurately range a target. The maximum range listed by the manufacturer is the farthest the model can return accurate results under ideal conditions. This is important because it makes up half of the purpose of the device, and different hunting styles require different maximum ranges.
6. Use your binoculars to view beyond the Milky Way.  Let’s leap out of our galaxy for the final stop in our binocular tour. Throughout fall and winter, she reigns high in the sky during northern hemisphere autumns and winters: Andromeda the Maiden. Centered in the star pattern is an oval patch of light, readily visible to the unaided eye away from urban lights. Binoculars will show it even better.

Continuing the trend of good options for the budget-minded individuals, we have the BARSKA Deep Sea 7×50 binoculars. Similar in style to the previous two offerings, this pair is excellent for water lovers and boating enthusiasts. They offer a similar set of functionalities as the previous two binoculars with rangefinders on our list, but their style and color choice is a bit different. They don’t have that green, military style, but instead come in a black and blue color combination. Nevertheless, they look pretty good.
For four generations, we’ve relied on family-centric values and the examples of character Vernon Kinsey, our founder, gave us. When life challenged Vernon, leaving him paralyzed below the waist, he turned his passion for archery into a profession. He persevered, built a successful business, treated everyone with respect and never let challenges hold him back. Today, Kinsey’s Outdoors honors Vernon’s legacy as we continuously strive to spread and support a love of the outdoors, spending time hunting and fishing with family and friends. 
Buying a rangefinder binocular can be a tricky affair. You might have the right budget and the right rangefinder binocular in mind. But there might still be a kind of doubt in your mind before the purchase. You may still think you might have forgotten to take some of the other aspects into account, leading to postponing the purchase. So that a situation like that does not arise, we have come up with the perfect rangefinder binocular buying guide for you. We have researched various aspects to note down the most important features of rangefinder binoculars and have listed them for you. It will be beneficial to have a look at it so that you do not miss out on any information. So here are the factors determining the kind of rangefinder binocular you can purchase.
To find the best binoculars, we had a professional ornithologist spend over 100 hours field-testing 17 pairs against his own $2,500 Leica Ultravids. After using our test pairs in the mountains and hills of Southern California, then on a research trip to the rain forests of southern Mexico, he found that the Athlon Optics Midas ED 8×42 pair was the best of the group, offering performance comparable to his Leicas for a fraction of the price and the widest field of view out of all the binoculars tested. This means you’ll see more, and it will look better.

Binoculars with rangefinders are undoubtedly one of the most popular pieces of optical equipment today. You can spot more and more of them out in the woods, as well as on the shooting range. Rangefinder binoculars are, actually, so popular, that some industry leaders predict that traditional binoculars, the ones that don’t have any distance information built-in, won’t exist in 15 to 20 years. Why, you may ask? Because binoculars with rangefinders are relatively common and the technology pretty ubiquitous. Now, to be honest, many of us won’t really think that we need binoculars with rangefinders for hunting, or for the shooting range but, the truth is, having one will prove to be useful sooner or later. Let’s take a better look at them.
As far as scientific terms go, you’ll find BAK-4 prisms, XTR coatings, as well as what Bushnell calls the Matrix Display Technology. This might be of interest, as the feature enhances display readings as much as possible. If you haven’t used a pair with this technology before, you might not think you need it. However, it undoubtedly proves to be very useful in some situations where you find it tricky to see the display. Those BAK-4 prisms are coated with PC-3 phase corrective coating. This ensures that you get a clear, sharp view and, with the magnification levels you get, you will actually get a clear view of every fine detail you might need.

With binoculars the old adage “you get what you pay for” still hold true to a significant degree. Precision optical instruments demand exacting standards in their production… and still comes at a price. Binoculars you pick up on offer at your local supermarket for €50 may be OK for occasionally watching ships sail by on a sunny day at the beach, but they will fall far short of ideal when trying to pick out subtle plumage detail on a small brown bird in a shady hedgerow, or spot the tell-tale signs of distant whales blowing offshore.
One of the easiest ways to take a spacewalk without ever leaving Earth is to scan the night sky with binoculars from the comfort of a reclining lounge chair on a clear, dark night. But for the best experience, you better make sure those binoculars are actually designed for astronomy. To see our picks for the best binoculars of various sizes and specialties, read our Best Astronomy Binoculars: Editors' Choice wrap-up. If you'd like help picking for yourself, there are a few things you need to know. 
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