The true renaissance of astronomy began when Nicholaus Copernicus proposed that the sun was at the center of the universe in the 16th century C.E. Less than 100 years later, Johannes Kepler introduced the Three Laws of Planetary Motion. Around the same time, Galileo was beginning his study of celestial beings with the aid of a telescope, leading him to discover Jupiter's four brightest moons. Astronomers have continued to make great strides in our understanding of the universe, discovering the first planets outside of our Solar System as recently as 1991.
The focus adjustment is pretty easy and accurate. You will also find there’s an on-board compass. If you calibrate it properly, it’s accurate as well, and during something like a sailboat trip, you’ll love the fact that it’s there. The distance measurement is another great addition, and even at this price point, it is fairly accurate. You will undoubtedly find it useful for things such as birdwatching or wildlife exploration and, both the rangefinder scale and compass have an illumination switch, which is useful in darker and overcast situations.
Weighing at 34.7 ounces, it is not the lightest of the lot. You might feel a bit fatigued after carrying it for a longer time period. But it has long-range capabilities which outweigh this aspect. The range is estimated to be from 10 to around 2000 yards, which is much more than a mile. The binocular has a micro sd card slot which can be used to feed the ballistic information. Having a field of view of about 374 feet per 1000 yards, it is one of the biggest you will come across. The range and field of view go hand in hand to deliver you the view of a much larger area through the binocular, something which most of the rangefinder binoculars cannot offer. This will easily make you forget the weight of the device.
Sticker shock is common when looking for your first pair of bins. If you're timid about spending multiple hundreds of dollars on a new hobby, the Celestron Nature DX 8x42 is a perfect choice. The image quality of these binoculars, which list for just $140 and often sell for less, is by far the best we've seen in this price range. In fact, it rivals models that cost more than twice as much in that regard. The supple focus knobs and easy eyecup adjustments continue the beginner-friendly trend. We also enjoyed that the 6.5ft focus range let us get a good look at any nearby butterflies or other interesting insects, a big plus for days when the birds just aren't singing.

Glass wise these are quite a step up from the Bushnell’s but not yet at the level of the Leica’s and Swaros. Ranging wise, they smoke the Bushnells and nudge just above Swarovski El’s. In fair weather (sun, overcast, light rain, etc) the Leica Geovid HD-B is going to outrange it most of the time. If weather turns to crap or there is heavy fog the Steiner will be unbeaten.
I’ve been birding since grade school and have spent the past 20 years working as a professional ornithologist, traveling worldwide to look for and learn about birds. I’ve published a couple dozen scientific papers and wrote Important Bird Areas of California, published in 2004 by Audubon California. Professionally, I lead birding trips for both beginners and experts, and for my “day job” I perform environmental surveys for individuals, conservation groups, corporations, and government agencies.
The PowerView series offers the largest line of The PowerView series offers the largest line of Bushnell-quality affordable binoculars. These Powerview 10 x 42 Roof Prism Binoculars feature multi-coated optics for superior light transmission and high-magnification full-size viewing ideal for long-range observation. The nonslip rubber armor absorbs shock while providing a firm grip.  More + Product Details Close
Astronomy is done in the dark, so you really want big aperture: big front lenses. These collect lots of light so you can see fainter things. This doesn't matter so much in the daytime, when there's plenty of light and you can get by with small front lenses — allowing daytime binoculars to be smaller, lighter, and less expensive. But for binoculars for astronomy, the bigger the aperture the better.

Resolution: resolution is a measure of your binocular’s ability to reveal the fine detail in the subject you’re viewing (individual feathers in a bird, for example), and of course a higher resolution image with more detail is always better. The main factors that affect the resolution of a binocular are the size of the objective lens, the magnification, the quality of the optical components and the lens and prism coatings.
Glass wise these are quite a step up from the Bushnell’s but not yet at the level of the Leica’s and Swaros. Ranging wise, they smoke the Bushnells and nudge just above Swarovski El’s. In fair weather (sun, overcast, light rain, etc) the Leica Geovid HD-B is going to outrange it most of the time. If weather turns to crap or there is heavy fog the Steiner will be unbeaten.
Combining excellent optical performance with ruggedness, portability, and comfort, the Diamondback 8x42 Binocular from Vortex Optics is ideal to take along on hiking trips, camping, traveling, or just in case. The optics feature improved transmission, contrast, and true color using fully multi-coated lenses and phase-corrected roof prisms. With the improved close focus of 5' you will get plenty of focusing range and a sharp focus on faraway scenery as well as close-ups of nearby street signs, monuments' details, or wildlife. The combination of 8x magnification and the 42mm objectives offers you a generous 60° angle of view that gives you complete images of targets.
When it comes to looking at the night skies, binoculars can work better than telescopes in some ways. They are more portable, intuitive to use and offer a wider field of view. If you like astronomy, you should have a decent pair of binoculars. Even if you already own a telescope or two, you should still have a minimum of one good pair of binoculars. If you are a beginning astronomer, or if you love to look up at the stars, then you will most likely use your binoculars even more than your telescope. The following is a quick guide on choosing astronomy binoculars. We’ve also listed our Top 3 Astronomy Binoculars for 2018.

This is a rather challenging topic when it comes to discussing binoculars. They are typically heavy products and keeping them steady might be an issue. The problem is, the larger the magnification, the more difficult it is to get a clear image, as even the smallest vibrations can manifest as a shaky, unusable image. A popular option is to mount them on a tripod. But if you’re on a boat, or in a car, the fact that they’re moving will counteract the tripod’s effect and you’ll still get a shaky image.
There are a number of binoculars with large eye relief, that are ideal for those who wear glasses. If you have used a bin without decent eye relief in the past, you know what a pain it can be. My recommendation for glasses wearers, are either the Swarovski EL (premium price, 20mm relief) or the Vanguard Endeavour ED II 8×42 (affordable price, 19.5mm relief), depending on your budget.
Bushnell Legends have great depth of view and give you a more realistic picture. The 8x feels more like a 10x and they retain most of these capabilities even when you zoom in a bit. Bird watchers will appreciate its brightness, which is a result of the high quality of coating used for  Legends. Near sighted people have noted that they can see far off objects through these without their glasses.
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The main downside to these bins is the price. A list price of $750 is pretty hefty. Plus, you can get brighter optics for less (like the Viper HD) if you're willing to deal with the weight of a full-sized pair of binoculars. But, if you want quality optics in the most portable package possible and are willing to pay for it, the Leica 10x25 Ultravid is the cream of the crop.
This is a rather challenging topic when it comes to discussing binoculars. They are typically heavy products and keeping them steady might be an issue. The problem is, the larger the magnification, the more difficult it is to get a clear image, as even the smallest vibrations can manifest as a shaky, unusable image. A popular option is to mount them on a tripod. But if you’re on a boat, or in a car, the fact that they’re moving will counteract the tripod’s effect and you’ll still get a shaky image.
For the ultimate in light-gathering ability and night sky viewing, these Orion Mini Giant Binoculars are hard to beat. That doesn’t mean they’re the most cost-effective solution however. Comparable in size to the 15×70 Celestron, these Orion’s are priced about $150 more. What do you get for the added price? Mostly higher-quality components and lenses.
If this japanese-made binocular looks European, that’s entirely intentional. It’s the first full-size bino from a new brand that hopes to marry European style and optical performance with retail prices achievable from the lower production costs of Asian partners. The Passion looks, feels, and performs like a higher-end European binocular. The machined aluminum eyecups are first-rate and the controls are tight and precise. The glass is excellent. The price is a bargain for an optic of this quality, especially considering the fully transferrable lifetime warranty.

Some people report success holding the end of the left barrel with the right hand, and letting the right barrel rest on the wrist, and then pushing them gently against the head. This creates more rigid mechanics than holding the binoculars for astronomy closer to the eyepieces. I've had limited success with this, so try it yourself and see what you think.

Quality construction also lends to a longer life for well cared for products. We judged each pair based on any alignment issue we could visually see, how smooth the hinges for adjusting the interpupillary distance were, we noted if anything was loose or coming apart, and we also took note of our biggest pet peeve: how well the lens caps fit. There is nothing like losing a lens cap to frustrate you on a trip.


Given the extreme similarity of design across makes and models, minor details of construction and performance can take on outsize importance. If you’re a long-time binoculars user, the most surprising difference will be that most models now focus in reverse direction compared with your old pair, meaning now you crank right for closer-in objects. In a couple of models (e.g., Opticron Oregon 4 LE WP), the strap hooks were located exactly where I’d rest my thumbs when looking through binoculars; maybe it’s just me, but I couldn’t get used to that. In one of the Opticron models, the black paint was chipping off the strap rivets as I pulled them out of the box, and the ring around one of the eyecups had become loose and was freely spinning by the time I attached the neck strap. In the Nikon Prostaff 7S model, the rubberized coating is so tacky that it kept pulling back on my fingertips (under the fingernail) as I was working the focus knob. It wasn’t exactly painful, but it wasn’t comfortable either. Obviously, these are personal annoyances, and none was enough to knock any particular model out of consideration for top pick. But it is worth noting that the Athlon Optics Midas ED didn’t present any of these issues.
The last element of today’s great, affordable binoculars is optical coatings. Lens coatings perform various functions, such as improving light transmission, reducing glare, and keeping colors true. Coating quality and levels used to be a key differentiator between cheap and expensive binoculars, but these days, lens coating technology has come down in price. All of our picks use the highest level, which is full multicoating, meaning that all glass surfaces—most binoculars have between 10 and 16 such surfaces, called optical elements—are coated.
During testing in Southern California and/or southern Mexico, a few other models proved very good at bringing in color under harsh conditions, including the Bushnell Legend L Series, Celestron TrailSeeker, Carson 3D, and the Nikon Monarch 5 (my favorite of four Nikon models at the target price point). Neither the Nikon nor the Carson model had the wide field of view at distance the Midas ED boasted. The Nikon was 361 feet at 1,000 yards versus 426 feet for the Athlons, Bushnells, and Celestrons, which had the widest fields of view I tested. The Carson 3D binoculars were incredibly sharp and easily as bright as the Athlons, but felt almost as if they had tunnel vision, likely because their field of view was around 20 percent narrower than that of the Athlons. These field-of-view differences proved more noticeable when trying to differentiate spot-breasted wrens from rufous-and-white wrens as they crawled through vine tangles in southern Mexico, for example; the Nikon pair’s narrower field, which had otherwise excellent glass, seemed to require more time to find the birds than the Athlon pair did (and tellingly, by the end of the trip, I was grabbing the Athlons each morning).

Barska's Battallion is a set of rangefinding binoculars that are sturdily made, offer fantastic optics, and can be bought at a great price. The rugged magnesium and aluminum frame is covered with a rubber coating for advanced shock resistance and optics protection. Offering an internal rangefinder with built-in compass, the binoculars provide great 8X magnification with a 30mm lens diameter.
Compact binoculars have a tough job. Their glass must be clear enough to transmit images through relatively small objective lenses, and their sized-down controls need to be tight and precise to work within the smaller frame. This Leupold gets those details right. The controls are nice, the image is bright and big for the compact platform, and we really liked the close focus. The Tioga got the highest durability score in the category, and it has a lifetime transferrable warranty should you need it.
Voted as the best binocular of 2016 by Best Binoculars Reviews, it is a device which has lived up to its potential. The EL series from Swarovski has been a mainstay for many years with the brand improving up on the models with the latest technologies. The changes with each version have been small, but the impact it has made on the ease of use and comfort is enormous. Starting with the design, the cutaway portion delivers a great place to hold the binocular securely. They have used magnesium alloy to manufacture the chassis, which is far more expensive than the aluminum or polycarbonate plastic frames. But the robustness the magnesium alloy brings to the table is incomparable.

At a magnification around 7x to 10x, position yourself so that you can hold the binoculars firmly in place while viewing. Binoculars with overly high magnification may cause unstable image and uncomfortable viewing due to shaking by hand movement. When using high-magnification binoculars, you can fix the binoculars in place using a tripod to steady your field of vision for extended viewing without any worries.
Binoculars are not required for birding, of course. Audubon’s Eric Lind recommends going out with a group of birders and trying their binoculars before you make a purchasing decision. The social aspects of birding, the sharing a sense of wonder and discovery, and the life-long learning experience is what makes birding so popular. There is no better way to cultivate that aspect of birding than through sharing the view of a bird through a friend’s binoculars or by handing your favorite pair to a family member to let them share in the experience.

Also look for binoculars that have been either nitrogen or argon purged. This means all the internal air has been replaced with a dry gas which will protect them from any internal fogging. This fogging can occur when you get rapid temperature changes or in places that have high humidity levels. A secondary benefit of this is that it protects the inner workings from corrosion because there is no internal moisture. For more information read my article on waterproof and fogproof binoculars  
I read your article and was interested in finding out more about the Digiscoping.  When I clicked on the link, which took me to see what products B&H was selling, I became very confused as to what I would actually need, since it showed "adapter rings", "holders", "SnapZoom adapters", etc.  We will soon be leaving for a South African (photo) Safari.  I have an Iphone 6 & my husband has an Iphone 7.  We also have some older binoculars (but I spent several hours researching the best options for possibly purchasing a new pair).  Since this is a one time trip, I do not want to invest a fortune (maybe $150 - $300), but I want to be able to get good views of the animals and possibly take some decent pictures of them, as well.  Can you please make some appropriate suggestions.  Also, are these new gadgits user friendly and will any of them work with older binoculars (Bushnell Citation, 7x35 or Bushnell Imageview 11-1025,10x25)? (The Bushnell Imageview 11-1025 has a built in camera, but drivers are no longers availble to download the pictures from it).  Any & all information would be greatly appreciated.
The good news is we really didn't run into any binoculars that were uncomfortable to hold. No matter what model you buy you'll likely be able to use them for hours on end without any nagging discomforts. However, small touches like the nice thumb indents on the Vortex Viper makes the bins feel a bit more ergonomic and comfortable. Likewise, the tacky rubber coating of the Nikon Monarch models lends a solid feeling grip whether you're fondling the barrels like you're double fisting beer cans, or using a dainty fingertip grip as if you're sipping tea at a fancy party.
No matter what you plan to gaze at, your binoculars need to do two things well: They need to make distant objects closer, and they need to make them clearer. The better the binoculars, the better you can see those birds up in trees, those athletes down on a field, the antlers of a deer crouching at the edge of a woodlot, or the butterflies gathering at a drying patch of mud along a trail. We’ve tried to pick binoculars that do well at all those tasks.

Here again Swarovski comes out on top with a close focus of 4.9 feet. I stand at 5'8", so functionally that means anything in front of my feet, be it a butterfly or another interesting insect, will be in focus. The Zeiss and Leica models are no slouches, both with a close focus of 6.2 feet, but the difference is very noticeable if you like to look at little critters.

There is also a lot of additional functionality with the BinoX-HD. For example, seeing as you have a sensor that’s capturing the image, there’s the ability to take a picture, or record video. The video can be either 1080p, at 30 frames per second, or 720p, at 60 frames per second, which is pretty good. At night, they’re very good, until you go past 10x magnification. This is where you’ll be having some issues, which is to be expected, honestly. However, when you consider the package of functionality you’re getting at the price ATN ask for the BinoX-HD, you’ll find that it’s very much worth it.


Whilst these SuperGiant astronomy binoculars have smaller objective lenses (80mm) than the Tachyon binoculars from Zhumell, this does mean that they weigh in at just 4.4 pounds, meaning they are small and light enough to use in the field, but of course are best mounted to a tripod and they come with a built in tripod mount that takes any standard photographic tripod for longer periods of observation.
When you’re new to stargazing, the first step seems obvious: buy a new telescope. But what will serve you just as well is a good pair of binoculars for astronomy. Binoculars bring the stars a bit closer to your eyes, with a larger field of view that makes the heavens a bit easier to understand. And even a good pair of binoculars will generally be cheaper than a new telescope. Browse the articles below for some tips on choosing the best binoculars for astronomy. You’ll also find articles that cover binocular basics, introducing you to the terms that you’ll need to know when you buy.
Carl Zeiss lenses are made in Germany and are world-renowned for their clarity, quality, and optical capabilities. In terms of image quality, you cannot buy much better range-finding binoculars. Well balanced, waterproof, with superb optics and range finding ability, the Carl Zeiss Victory RF Binoculars make calculating distance a snap. They are all-around excellent, and we can recommend them without any reservation. This product is an absolute joy to use.
If you are going to a place where others are already viewing the stars, it is necessary that you be careful not to interrupt their viewing by thoughtlessly shining your flashlight around. Make sure that your eyes have thoroughly adjusted before moving about. You should also reduce the light level by draping red cellophane or a red handkerchief over the light to lessen the glare.
Each month, as the moon goes through its regular phases, you can see the line of sunrise and sunset on the moon progress across the moon’s face. That’s just the line between light and dark on the moon. This line between the day and night sides of the moon is called the terminator line.  The best place to look at the moon from Earth – using your binoculars – is along the terminator line. The sun angle is very low in this twilight zone, just as the sun is low in our sky around earthly twilight.  So, along the terminator on the moon, lunar features cast long shadows in sharp relief.
The “42” in our 10x42 binocular refers to the diameter of the objective (front) lens in millimeters. Since the objectives will often be the largest portion of the optic, it will affect the overall size and weight of the binocular, and how much light it can gather. In basic terms: larger objectives allow more light to pass through them than smaller lenses, which means images will appear brighter, sharper, and clearer. However, the larger objectives will also add bulk and weight, and that is where certain tradeoffs and compromises need to be considered when deciding if certain models will be convenient to carry, pack, hold, and use comfortably.
Image stabilized binoculars are those with a compensating mechanism which adjusts many times per second, usually in conjunction with electronics, to eliminate most movements in the image you view. While the compensating mechanism may vary between brand names, the concept of stabilizing the view remains constant and amazes those who've not previously experienced it. Naturally, the compensating mechanism, electronics and batteries all add weight to the binocular. The benefits, however, outweigh the costs to the extent that these binoculars are rapidly gaining in popularity. It's up to you to decide whether these types of optics qualify as "best binoculars for astronomy." They're quite nice, but they're not essential to enjoying the celestial sites.
The design of the rangefinder binocular makes a big difference. It has to be compact and lightweight for you to easily handle. The weight defines how easily you can take it with you. You should have the ability to carry it with you without being fatigued. Also, if it is too compact, there is always a chance of the device falling off from your hands. A balance between compactness and weight would be the ideal match for a good rangefinder binocular.
Celestron shall use reasonable efforts to repair or replace any product covered by this warranty within thirty days of receipt. In the event repair or replacement shall require more than thirty days, Celestron shall notify the customer accordingly. Celestron reserves the right to replace any product which has been discontinued from its product line with a new product of comparable value and function.
Let’s take a look at what’s important. First of all, the USCAMEL feels very solid. Their build quality is great, and they’re built to last. The body is rubber-coated, which allows for a comfortable and firm grip, and you get some shock resistance as well. They’re built for outdoor use, even in some more extreme conditions such as mountaineering or watersports. The fact that they’re dust-proof and waterproof means that they’ll survive whatever you decide to throw at them.
Built-in ARC Bow Mode delivers the "shoots-like" horizontal distance, while ARC Rifle Mode provides precise bullet-drop and holdover information. Our new Matrix Display Technology, RainGuard® HD anti-fog coating and a fully waterproof design ensure reliability and clarity in all conditions. It's the best of all worlds Bushnell, in your hands and at your command.
Binoculars get beat up and dusty, and cheap ones go out of alignment in a few weeks or with a good knock, resulting in double vision or blurry patches. For the record, I accidentally dropped the Athlon Midas ED binoculars onto a dirt road in Mexico (right onto the focus knob!), brushed them off and found they worked just fine. Nearly all companies I was able to reach offer a full, transferable, lifetime warranty of the “you can drive over it with a truck” type, but I recommend researching warranties before buying any model, because their details may change in the future.
If you're concerned about size, you can drop down to a pair of Zeiss (top of the line brand) 32mm Terra ED's. This one is on sale, so supplies are limited...but they're one of the best out there. ED glass, fully multi-coated, wide angle of view, water and fogproof, and an extremely short close focus distance. I highly recommend these if you can get them while they last. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1116044-REG/zeiss_523206_9906_000_terra_binocular_10x32_edition_under.html
For a pair of high powered rangefinder binoculars, they do give you a state-of-the-art view. You’ll want to take them outside and use them for a while if you want to see just how good the view is. The fact that they have very few aberrations means that you’ll be able to see every imperfection in a window. In both barrels, the optics are very sharp. Focus snap, as mentioned, is extremely precise, which is a sign of high quality optics. All in all, they’re among the best rangefinder binoculars for hunting or wildlife observation that you will come across.
Here the Leica bins have a slight edge. When comparing the 10x magnification models, Leica provides a 376-foot wide field of view at 1000 yards. The Swarovski bins are second with a 336-foot field of view, and Zeiss comes in last at 330 feet. If you opt for an 8x magnification model the Leica and Zeiss field of views increase to 443 and 408 feet, respectively. Swarovski does not make 8x bins, but the 8.5x version provides a field of view of 399 feet.
The binocular renders views in high contrast with accurate color through the use of high-definition (HD) extra-low dispersion (ED) glass, an apochromatic lens configuration, XR-Plus lens coatings, and dielectric and phase-correcting prism coatings, which raise the level of optical excellence for this roof prism binocular. The benefits include excellence in color sharpness, coating durability, overall performance, increased resolution, color fidelity, clarity, brightness, and greater light transmission. Additional lens protection from scratches, oil and dust is provided by the ArmorTek exterior lens coating.
What makes the Athlon Optics Midas ED binoculars great? For starters, their brightness. A lot of birding and using binoculars in general involves looking out or up at something much brighter, like the sky, or darker, such as into a dense thicket. Just as your autofocus camera can’t figure out how to illuminate something against a bright (or overcast) sky, binoculars may have difficulty mustering the light needed to brighten the distant object you’re trying to identify. Also tough is the inverse of this situation, looking into dark, dense vegetation, a situation in which you need all the light-gathering ability the binoculars can give you. The Athlon Optics Midas ED performed well on both fronts. For example, several other models tested would not allow me to differentiate throat coloration of warblers in treetops early in the morning. With the Athlons, it was almost as if the glaring, whitish background of sky wasn’t there—the colors popped to life.
AWESOME! These Binoculars are really great especially for a beginner night sky watcher like myself. They were easy to start using and I am really enjoying them. While I hope to eventually graduate to a telescope, for someone who is just starting out, these are fantastic and are a great bang for the buck as well. I would definately recommend these to any amateur sky gazer.
Convenient Design: The binocular design provides additional weight with a wider body that allows for a sturdier two-hand grip. The design also helps keep the hands stable so that users are more likely to correctly range the target with the first attempt. This is also helpful for getting readings at higher magnifications, and this is especially true when compared to vertical rangefinders.

Before you get into the details you should know what a rangefinder is. It is a device used to measure the distance between you and your target. It uses an advanced piece of optics to zoom in on your target to get a better look at it. The difference between a binocular and a rangefinder is that rangefinders display the measure of distance on the display. When the display of a binocular is integrated with the rangefinder function of measurement, it is called rangefinder binocular. The device came into existence when the military started using it to collect important mission data from a distance. Though, lately, it has become popular commercially among other activities too.
Buying a rangefinder binocular can be a tricky affair. You might have the right budget and the right rangefinder binocular in mind. But there might still be a kind of doubt in your mind before the purchase. You may still think you might have forgotten to take some of the other aspects into account, leading to postponing the purchase. So that a situation like that does not arise, we have come up with the perfect rangefinder binocular buying guide for you. We have researched various aspects to note down the most important features of rangefinder binoculars and have listed them for you. It will be beneficial to have a look at it so that you do not miss out on any information. So here are the factors determining the kind of rangefinder binocular you can purchase.
I’ll try to point the way, with a caveat that my methodology is appallingly unscientific; a field-based approach, you might charitably call it. I used each of these binoculars on assignment in Norway, North Dakota and Vermont, and on my sun-porch in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with an infant in my arms, glassing the horizon for any passerine that might happen to wing into view, as they so often do, seemingly from nowhere. Bearing in mind all of the above, here are five of the best birding binoculars you’ll find.
Binocular rangefinders work on the principle of shooting laser on the target and using it to measure the distance between you and the target. But there is more to it. With developing technologies, rangefinders, in general, have come a long way. Compared to the latest rangefinders, the older versions are nowhere near as accurate. It currently comes with a lot of features which makes the purpose of target range measuring much easier. So now you have a better understanding of what a rangefinder binocular is, let us get into the things you have to consider.
Curious about those singing summer nester you keep hearing in the trees? Trying to scout out some new routes from afar? We purchased 16 of the best binoculars on the market then brought them birding, backpacking, and bushwacking, all to find the perfect pair for your next outing. Binoculars can be somewhat confusing with 100's of nearly identical looking models only differentiated by arcane specifications and vague claims of crystal clear images. We're here to cut through the confusion with our side-by-side testing results. Whether you're an aspiring bird nerd, prepping for a once in a lifetime safari, or want to be able to take a closer look at the cool things you see along the trail, we can guide you to the right pair of bins.
A related consideration is the exit pupil, the size of the little round disk of light that you see floating in the air behind the eyepieces when you hold the binoculars out in front of you toward a bright sky or a bright indoor wall. The size of the exit pupil is an important factor that's often overlooked. To determine it, just divide the aperture by the magnification — and luckily these are inscribed right there on the back facing you. For example, 7x50 binoculars have about a 7-mm exit pupil, while 10x50s have a 5-mm exit pupil.
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