In general astronomical binoculars should not really be thought of as a substitute for a telescope, rather you should think of them as something to be used along with your scope, especially when you want to get a wider field of view and see more of the sky at once. But to give you an idea of what kind of things you can see, the observations below were made whilst using the great value Celestron SkyMaster 25x70 Binoculars on a night with an almost full moon and a fair amount of light pollution:
Recommendation: balance and handling is a very personal thing, but you should be able to get some idea of what the binoculars on your shortlist are like by reading reviews online from people who’ve spent time with the binoculars on your short-list. Try searching birding and wildlife forums (like Bird Forum) for recommendations by owners — and try and get to use as many different types of binocular as you can to see how different models and different styles feel to you (see point 10 on Try Before you Buy).
That’s not much to go on, and a lousy assessment of an optic’s best asset: the glass inside its tubes. That’s where Out- door Life’s annual Optics Test can help. We rst measure the optical clarity of a bin- ocular or riflescope on a resolution range. Then our test team (for personnel, see p. 54) measures how late into the darkness the submissions can see a black-and-white target (we do this on three separate eve- nings and average the results). We then peer into the guts of the optic with ash- lights, assessing internal lens coatings and quality of construction. We shoot with the riflescopes to assess their reticles and turrets. We glass with binoculars. We rate products on repeatable measurements of optical and mechanical capability and on subjective assessments of performance. We also assign a value score to each optic; the product with the best value score wins our Great Buy award. The top overall score in each category gets our Editor’s Choice award.
Like every set of binoculars, astronomy binoculars will have two main features: magnification and the objective lens size. So for example, if the binoculars are 10×50 it means they have 10x magnification and 50mm objective lenses. The secret to choosing the perfect night time binoculars is getting the right balance between magnification and lens size that will result in a clear, bright and stable image.
The larger SkyMaster models (80mm and 100mm ) have been designed by Celestron to meet the special demands of extended astronomical or terrestrial viewing sessions and include features like enhanced structural reinforcement to the main binocular body. and an integral super rigid photo tripod adapter to enable easy attachment to tripods and other fixing devices.
Completely water and weather-proof, the system is purged with nitrogen to provide advanced anti-fogging in any viewing conditions. They are also shock-resistant thanks to the rubber-coated body and are one of the sturdiest range finding binoculars you can buy. For their great construction quality, durability, as well as superior image quality, the USCAMEL HD Binoculars set makes for a powerful optical tool that you will be able to use for years to come.
When it comes to looking at the night skies, binoculars can work better than telescopes in some ways. They are more portable, intuitive to use and offer a wider field of view. If you like astronomy, you should have a decent pair of binoculars. Even if you already own a telescope or two, you should still have a minimum of one good pair of binoculars. If you are a beginning astronomer, or if you love to look up at the stars, then you will most likely use your binoculars even more than your telescope. The following is a quick guide on choosing astronomy binoculars. We’ve also listed our Top 3 Astronomy Binoculars for 2018.
For the better part of two decades, all of my birding was done with a cast-off pair of Eddie Bauer 10 x 25 compact binoculars that seemed to have fallen down a chimney. The previous owner must have been glad to get rid of them. You could scarcely read a stop sign at 300 feet, and they were covered, inexplicably, with some kind of sooty marl, like a moss-colored gunpowder.
It has a magnification of 10×42. When combined with the lens quality, it lets you the ability to observe far and give crystal clear images of your target. It has an 18 mm eye relief. It is considered to be one of the highest which it comes to rangefinder binoculars. It results in your eye being comfortable the whole time you are staring through it. This is the rangefinder binocular you should buy if you are looking for something which is a symbol of perfection. Click here to see the best price. Click here to see the best price.
"I ordered these, and have been very impressed. A small river with many birds and deer runs against my property, and a friend was watching a heron on 5/3/17. He took the binoculars, rested them on a small clock near my sink, adding one of my artist's paint brushes, to prop them up the way he wanted, and took this photo with his iPhone THRU the binoculars! The heron was about 80 yards away. The second pic is of his 'set up.' I never knew the binoculars would be used to take distant pictures through, but you can see it's possible!"
Binocular stargazing is an immensely pleasurable and fascinating activity. And Orion Telescopes & Binoculars has been the leading name in astronomy binoculars for three decades. Browse this section for Orion's all-star lineup of big-aperture astronomy binoculars. Any one of them can reveal countless treasures of the night sky. Two-eyed touring with astronomy binoculars is not only comfortable, but provides a more 3D-like depth of field than you get with a telescope, and can be done spur of the moment.
Along with the larger objective lens comes more weight and the need for support - usually a tripod as noted above. You may simply go with what is most convenient to purchase for your first tripod, but wooden ones are typically preferred because they help to dampen vibrations which would otherwise be transmitted to the instrument. Is the type of tripod of tremendous importance? It certainly isn't at first, at least to our way of thinking.
Wider field of view. You spot a bird high up in a tree and quickly raise your binoculars to your eyes. The wider the field of view, the more likely that your aim will be correct and that the bird will instantly be in the field of view, without having to search about for it. This is especially true for smaller, fast moving birds that don't stay put. Lower magnification in binoculars means a wider field of view, so many birders prefer 8x to 10x.
Note that most 15x, 20x or 25x binoculars can still be used without a tripod for short periods of time. A tripod is recommended if you want to use them for longer periods of time or if you choose to buy the larger and heavier models. Remember that high magnification will allow you to see further and in more detail. The downside is that with higher magnification usually comes a narrower field of view and a less stable image.
Complementing lens coatings are prism coatings, which increase light reflection and improve image brightness and contrast. While many manufacturers may use standard reflective coatings, the upper echelon of prism coatings is called dielectric coatings, which allow almost 100% of the light through the prism, resulting in brighter high-contrast images.
The ultimate in efficiency, the Fusion melds the best of Bushnell binoculars with world-leading laser range finding capabilities. Every detail is magnified with rich contrast and stunning clarity from edge to edge using premium fully multi-coated optics and BaK-4 prisms. At the push of a button, it displays exact distance to your target from 10 to 1,760 yards.
Sturdy, lightweight, and compact the Bushnell Fusion ARC binocular laser rangefinder offers the complete package for distance calculation married with excellent optical viewing ability. The 8X magnification coupled with a 32mm lens diameter provides an outstanding viewing experience. If that was not enough, these binoculars also feature an angle range compensation (ARC) laser that can precisely detect and determine ranges between 10 and 1760 yards.

I believe the best binoculars are the ones you have with you. Meaning: Buy the pair you'll be most likely to take on your travels more often, whether you're going out into the backyard or across the planet. That implies a smaller and lighter form factor, which tends to be lower power. If this is your only pair, I'd suggest an objective no larger than 50 mm (the number after the "x," as in 7x40), and a magnification no bigger than 10x.
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