The sole obligation of Celestron under this limited warranty shall be to repair or replace the covered product, in accordance with the terms set forth herein. Celestron expressly disclaims any lost profits, general, special, indirect or consequential damages which may result from breach of warranty, or arising out of the use or inability to use any Celestron product. Any warranties which are implied and which cannot be disclaimed shall be limited in duration to a term of one year from the date of original retail purchase. 

Eyecups on the binoculars ensure that your eyes will be at the correct distance, but if you wear glasses, you can't get your eyes as close to the lenses, so you need to adjust the eyecups to ensure that even with your glasses on your eyes are the correct distance from the ocular lenses. Binoculars with a longer eye relief are ideal for those who wear glasses as they basically project the image further beyond the ocular lens, giving you plenty of room to play with. So if you wear glasses, you should be looking for an eye relief of at least 15mm, to see the full image full image.


Very bright, clear display with 4-step intensity adjustment; easily readable under any lighting conditions and against various subjects, with single or continuous measurement up to 8 seconds. Displays in increments of 0.1m/yd, when shorter than 100m/yds and in 1m/yd at 100m/yds and over. Auto power shut-off function saves battery life by shutting down after 8 seconds of non-use. (*For reference. Under Nikon’s Measurement conditions. The specifications of the product may not be achieved depending on the target object's shape, surface texture and nature, and/or weather conditions.)
We loved the eyecups on the Swarovski and Zeiss models. Both use threaded eyecups that twist in and out and have very conspicuous stopping points, so you can be sure both eye cups are set on the same depth. The Lecia bins also use threaded eyecups, but the stopping points aren't as solid, and we often had trouble getting both cups set to the same depth. This was particularly annoying when sharing the bins amongst multiple testers with different eyecup preferences, as it took much more finagling to get the eyecups to an acceptable and even setting.
Whilst the size of the objective lens determines to a large degree how much light can enter the binoculars, it does not completely determine how much light enters your eyes, which is far more important. A measurement known as the Exit Pupil gives you the width of the column of light exiting the eye-piece and is calculated by dividing the Objective Lens size by the Magnification of the binoculars.
The white highlands, nestled between the maria, are older terrain pockmarked by thousands of craters that formed over the eons. Some of the larger craters are visible in binoculars. One of them, Tycho, emanates long swatches of white rays for hundreds of miles over the adjacent highlands. This is material kicked out during the Tycho impact 2.5 million years ago.

On the other hand, if you are happy to keep your binoculars fixed in one location and used mainly for astronomy and long distance viewing then go with a larger and more powerful model. Remember that the larger the lenses are, the better your binoculars will be for astronomy – as simple as that! It is no surprise that most astronomy binoculars are also referred to as “Giant Binoculars.” Big lenses mean brighter images.
Hopefully you found the information included above to be useful. You can use all of the information to streamline your decision-making process as to whether or not you want to purchase rangefinder binoculars, and also use it to better educate yourself about this technology – as well as others. They are definitely incredible tools, but may or may not be useful in your specific circumstance or situation.
Accuracy. No matter how experienced you are in hunting, you can only come out with a ‘rough estimation’ of the distance of a prey. Rough estimation often means the accuracy of the measured distance is pretty much skewed. I am not trying to undermine experienced hunters but it’s normal that manual calculations are susceptible to human error. What more if you are an absolute beginner?
Eyecups on the binoculars ensure that your eyes will be at the correct distance, but if you wear glasses, you can't get your eyes as close to the lenses, so you need to adjust the eyecups to ensure that even with your glasses on your eyes are the correct distance from the ocular lenses. Binoculars with a longer eye relief are ideal for those who wear glasses as they basically project the image further beyond the ocular lens, giving you plenty of room to play with. So if you wear glasses, you should be looking for an eye relief of at least 15mm, to see the full image full image.
The term “roof prism” was originally applied to the Abbe-Koenig (AK) prism design that corrected an image horizontally and vertically while maintaining a straight line from the point at which the light enters the prism and exits it. While the AK prism configuration is the most common, there are others that are variations on the original AK design, such as the Amici and Schmidt-Pechan (SP). While they accomplish the same basic function, the optical paths take different routes to correct the image orientation. The main advantage of the SP design is that it is more compact than both the Amici and AK prisms, resulting in thinner optical tubes that tend to be more comfortable to hold—especially during long glassing sessions. Zeiss is known for using SP prisms.
Inside, things are more or less what you’d expect from a pair of binoculars like these. The prism is a Hi-index BAK4 prism, which has been proven to give you a sharp and bright image, with plenty of contrast. When you’re looking at an object, you can be sure that you see every little detail of it. The 22 mm lens design won’t cause any eye fatigue, or dizziness, and your view will be a combination of HD and wide angle. The 50 mm objective lens, on the other hand, is large enough to ensure that even in low light conditions, such as at dawn, or at dusk, or even at night, you will receive as much light as possible inside, making the image bright.

The Vanguard Endeavor ED are lower-powered binoculars with a 10x magnification. Along with a 114m field of view, this Vanguard model is best suited for faster-paced action and outdoor activities. They have one of the largest objective lens diameter of the binoculars we reviewed, so they’ll perform better in low- and poor-light surroundings, making them a good pair of hunting binoculars on early mornings.
Binocular rangefinders work on the principle of shooting laser on the target and using it to measure the distance between you and the target. But there is more to it. With developing technologies, rangefinders, in general, have come a long way. Compared to the latest rangefinders, the older versions are nowhere near as accurate. It currently comes with a lot of features which makes the purpose of target range measuring much easier. So now you have a better understanding of what a rangefinder binocular is, let us get into the things you have to consider.
Buying a rangefinder binocular can be a tricky affair. You might have the right budget and the right rangefinder binocular in mind. But there might still be a kind of doubt in your mind before the purchase. You may still think you might have forgotten to take some of the other aspects into account, leading to postponing the purchase. So that a situation like that does not arise, we have come up with the perfect rangefinder binocular buying guide for you. We have researched various aspects to note down the most important features of rangefinder binoculars and have listed them for you. It will be beneficial to have a look at it so that you do not miss out on any information. So here are the factors determining the kind of rangefinder binocular you can purchase.
Binoculars come in two basic designs based on the type of prism used in their optical construction — the traditional porr0-prism design and the more modern roof-prism design. Until relatively recently porro-prisms were by far the most common type of binocular on the market. However as the prices for high-quality roof-prism design has come down their popularity has increased.
The main reason why these are perfectly fine for astronomy is that they have mid-level or perhaps even high-level multicoated 50mm lenses. Unlike other low-priced models these truly deliver the brightness and sharpness you need when stargazing at night. The optics are simply remarkable for this price range. There is no distortion on the sides of the image and the focusing mechanism operates smoothly every time.
Pros: The waterproof and fogproof chassis protects your binoculars from moisture damage. At 22.1 ounces, these are one of the lighter pairs of binoculars we reviewed, and testers found them comfortable to hold and easier to adjust than many other models. Testers also reported consistently bright and clear images, and its 17.7mm eye relief is one of the best we saw.
Celestron has designed this model to meet the demands of extended astronomical or terrestrial viewing sessions and the 25×70 version is one of the most popular models in the Skymaster series. They offer large aperture light gathering and so open up more stargazing opportunities and are relatively light but include an adapter so they can be used with a standard camera tripod.
I believe the best binoculars are the ones you have with you. Meaning: Buy the pair you'll be most likely to take on your travels more often, whether you're going out into the backyard or across the planet. That implies a smaller and lighter form factor, which tends to be lower power. If this is your only pair, I'd suggest an objective no larger than 50 mm (the number after the "x," as in 7x40), and a magnification no bigger than 10x.
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