Binocular stargazing is an immensely pleasurable and fascinating activity. And Orion Telescopes & Binoculars has been the leading name in astronomy binoculars for three decades. Browse this section for Orion's all-star lineup of big-aperture astronomy binoculars. Any one of them can reveal countless treasures of the night sky. Two-eyed touring with astronomy binoculars is not only comfortable, but provides a more 3D-like depth of field than you get with a telescope, and can be done spur of the moment.
But not all binoculars are created equally, and they are not one-size-fits-all either. Subtle differences in performance and quality can mean the difference between enjoyment and frustration. Active Junky pulled together some of the best binoculars on the market from reputable brands to help you choose which pair is right for your favorite activities. And don’t forget to sign up for Active Junky for cashback on your gear purchases.
As far as scientific terms go, you’ll find BAK-4 prisms, XTR coatings, as well as what Bushnell calls the Matrix Display Technology. This might be of interest, as the feature enhances display readings as much as possible. If you haven’t used a pair with this technology before, you might not think you need it. However, it undoubtedly proves to be very useful in some situations where you find it tricky to see the display. Those BAK-4 prisms are coated with PC-3 phase corrective coating. This ensures that you get a clear, sharp view and, with the magnification levels you get, you will actually get a clear view of every fine detail you might need.
No-quibble returns: given how difficult it can be to get “hands on” time with high-quality optics in some places, some mail order companies (particularly in the US — but increasingly in Europe) offer a no-quibble return policy allowing you to order with confidence, try the binoculars for a few weeks, and return them for a full refund if you’re not happy, no questions asked.

Jupiter. Now on to the real action!  Jupiter is a great binocular target, even for beginners.   If you are sure to hold your binoculars steadily as you peer at this bright planet,  you should see four bright points of light near it.  These are the Galilean Satellites – four moons gleaned through one of the first telescopes ever made, by the Italian astronomer Galileo. Note how their relative positions change from night to night as each moon moves around Jupiter in its own orbit.
This is a supersized binocular suited to glassing distant targets for long periods of time. The double-hinge design creates a nice space for hands to hold it, but you will probably want to mount this 3-pound Leupold on a tripod. The mounting bracket is smartly located on the inside hinge of the Leupold (see Innovations, right). Hits: tight controls, the battleship-gray armor, the webby texture that wraps the aluminum-alloy chassis, and the first-rate carry case and neck strap. Misses: disappointing resolution and image quality.
The SkyMaster Giant 15x70 binoculars by Celestron have one of the highest magnifications of all the binoculars that Top Ten Reviews checked out, making these ideal for looking at stars, planets, comets and other distant objects in the night sky. Images appear crisp and clear though these binoculars, but you may need a tripod to keep the view steady with such a high magnification (15x). The binoculars have large, 70-millimeter objective lenses that direct ample light to your eyes when used in a low-light setting. And if you wear glasses, you can rest assured that you don't need to take them off before looking through these binoculars.
For careful budgeters, we recommend Oberwerk's 20X80 Deluxe II and 25X100 individual focus models which provide good values for their prices. If your budget is flexible, there are many fine, giant binoculars that will provide very good value for their purchase prices. We plan ongoing reviews of astronomy binoculars as OpticsReviewer.com grows, so please check back from time to time as your astronomy interests evolve!
dless of whether you’re an expert with an extensive collection of rangefinder binoculars, or someone who’s only getting their first pair, choosing the right ones can be tricky. Making the wrong choice can cost you $90-100, or it could easily go into the thousands if you buy a premium pair of binoculars. When you consider all of the variables, making a wrong choice isn’t that hard. Things such as zoom or fixed, or image stabilization, or even the numbers in the name can be confusing for someone who isn’t well versed in the topic. However, as you saw above, clearing them up isn’t that difficult, and if you do know what you need, getting the right pair isn’t all that difficult either.

It can also handle some of the toughest ranging scenarios with a small beam divergence. The model has exceptional optical quality that results in clarity beyond 1,400 yards. This is due to the fluoride glass used for its optics. The Victory RF is designed with comfort in mind as it features large easy-to-press buttons that click when pressed. The Zeiss Victory RF costs $3,300 for this 10×56 model and less than $3,000 for the 10×45.
Zeiss is in no way a new player in the field of optics. They’re synonymous with extremely high quality, if you can afford them, and with the Victory 10×56, they live up to their name. Let’s kick things off with the build quality. Even if you’re a person who doesn’t really take a lot of care about their things, you’ll be good to go with these. They’re built to be sturdy and maintain their performance even if you do drop them once or twice. This build quality also extends to waterproofing, which is always appreciated. They’re also nitrogen filled, which, as mentioned a few times above, won’t let your lenses fog up on the inside. Cleaning the lenses is a breeze, which is in most part thanks to a coating that Zeiss put on their lenses.
Because the human pupil is about the same size as the binoculars' exit pupil, the emergent light at the eyepiece then fills the eye's pupil, meaning no loss of brightness in low light conditions due to using these binoculars (assuming perfect transmission). Thus the result is that you will perceive the image as being as bright as if you were to see it with the naked eyes.
I read your article and was interested in finding out more about the Digiscoping.  When I clicked on the link, which took me to see what products B&H was selling, I became very confused as to what I would actually need, since it showed "adapter rings", "holders", "SnapZoom adapters", etc.  We will soon be leaving for a South African (photo) Safari.  I have an Iphone 6 & my husband has an Iphone 7.  We also have some older binoculars (but I spent several hours researching the best options for possibly purchasing a new pair).  Since this is a one time trip, I do not want to invest a fortune (maybe $150 - $300), but I want to be able to get good views of the animals and possibly take some decent pictures of them, as well.  Can you please make some appropriate suggestions.  Also, are these new gadgits user friendly and will any of them work with older binoculars (Bushnell Citation, 7x35 or Bushnell Imageview 11-1025,10x25)? (The Bushnell Imageview 11-1025 has a built in camera, but drivers are no longers availble to download the pictures from it).  Any & all information would be greatly appreciated.

Combine Nikon binocular performance with the extreme speed and ranging technology of a 1900-yard laser rangefinder and you have LaserForce, Nikon’s 10x42 Rangefinder Binocular. Quite simply the single optic solution for serious hunters who depend on both their binocular for picking out distant animals and their rangefinder for getting the exact distance before taking the shot.


Although perhaps not familiar with the Navy study behind it, many know about the 7X50 binocular configuration having been used by the military for low light conditions. What are the best astronomy binoculars? The best astronomy binoculars for beginners will doubtless be the general purpose 7X50 to 10X50 configurations. They're the most popular "small" astronomy binoculars and for a good reason! To start with, they're about the largest that can comfortably be held by hand for the extended periods often encountered by stargazers. They also provide an excellent field of view and will gather all the light you want for the size, since larger objective lenses make a binocular significantly heavier. If these are for a youthful face, you'll want to ensure that you choose an instrument that has an appropriate interpupillary distance. You'll also want to consider the binocular's weight and the strength of the person who will be using it. Star watchers usually hold binoculars up to their eyes for longer periods than bird watchers do!
The construction is sturdy, ergonomic, and is easy to hold and operate. With 8X magnification and a 42mm lens diameter, the product delivers high-quality imagery thanks to Leica’s proprietary prism system. These binoculars are a fantastic, advanced tool for hunters and marksmen alike, who'll appreciate the Leica 8x42 Geovid's rugged construction and superior optics. It is a great addition to your gear.
Depth of field: the depth of field is a term that describes the amount of a scene, from near to far, that appears sharp at any given point of focus. This factor is often overlooked, but a better depth of field means less “fiddling” with the focus wheel in use, and can make a huge difference to your experience when using binoculars in the field for extended periods.
The good news is that the true technological improvements in binoculars over the past few years have come not in gimmicky features, but optics. Whereas 20 years ago you might have needed to spend $500 to get decent, waterproof binoculars from a factory in the Midwest, now the recent manufacturing boom in China has brought us increasingly cheaper versions of familiar products, resulting in a crush of nearly identical binoculars—more than 2,000 models right now on Amazon, for example—most of them featuring similar designs.
Similarly to the USCAMEL mentioned above, the Hooway are also full of nitrogen, meaning they won’t fog up in subpar conditions. This could be a dealbreaker for many, and it’s good to see that Hooway thought of it. You get a wide field of view, as mentioned above, thanks to the porro prism system. The prism is BAK4, and the optics are fully coated. All of this combined gives you a crisp and bright image you’ll enjoy. And, you also get an illuminated compass that will prove to be useful, as well as an internal rangefinder to help you determine distance and the size of an object.
Check the eye relief. Most binoculars have eyecups that retract to accommodate eyeglass wearers or extend to provide shading for those without. Look for durable, multi-adjustable eyecups. If you wear glasses, adjust the eyecups to their minimum position and make sure there’s enough eye relief—you shouldn’t see black rings around the image. Our Eyeglass Friendliness score helps indicate this.

Complementing lens coatings are prism coatings, which increase light reflection and improve image brightness and contrast. While many manufacturers may use standard reflective coatings, the upper echelon of prism coatings is called dielectric coatings, which allow almost 100% of the light through the prism, resulting in brighter high-contrast images.

Their build quality is good which is actually a bit surprising, as many manufacturers’ first place for cutting corners when they want to save money is build quality. Fortunately, BARSKA decided to go against that, and you have an ergonomic, non-slip grip which won’t fall out of your hand. The rubber armor is shockproof and heavy duty and will hold in various rough conditions. Another great thing while we’re discussing the build quality is that the binoculars are floating, and even if you do manage to drop them in the water, they’ll stay on the surface, making them easy to find. Like you’d expect, they’re fully waterproof, and sealed with O-rings. They are also filled with nitrogen, which means they won’t fog up or get damaged by moisture, regardless of the weather conditions. By now this might be a common sighting with binoculars of this class, but you don’t notice how useful it is until you’ve had to use a pair that doesn’t have that kind of protection.

You can use our EarthSky Tonight page to locate planets visible around now.  Notice if any planets are mentioned in the calendar on the Tonight page, and if so click on that day’s link.  On our Tonight page, we feature planets on days when they’re easily identifiable for some reason – for example, when a planet is near the moon.  So our Tonight page calendar can help you come to know the planets, and, as you’re learning to identify them, keep your binoculars very handy. Binoculars will enhance your view of a planet near the moon, for example, or two planets near each other in the twilight sky. They add a lot to the fun!
Recommendation: while few people will buy binoculars solely on the strength of a warranty, and hopefully you won’t need to avail of it, a manufacturer’s willingness to stand over their product is obviously a major plus. Focus on features and the overall quality of the binocular first — but do consider the warranty in the “mix” before making your final selection.
Observing with both eyes not only feels more natural, but your brain can actually form a better image when when using the "information" sent to it from both eyes. I have written more about this phenomenon in the section entitled "Two eyes are Better than one" in this article on Observation Binoculars with Angled Eyepieces if you are interested to learn more.
Features: It is super powerful and portable to be taken. Suitable for both indoor  and outdoor using. Durable and protective for long time using. FMC glass lenses deliver the ultimate brightness and resolution. Ergonomic design for comfortable handling. It can apply in  military, travel and more places. Streamlined shape,smooth central focus knob for simple operation.
Bought these items for a family member for hunting. First impressions are wow these things are great. They feel good in the hand a little heavy but expected that from a cheap pair of binoculars. Then started to use and found out they are great products. My brother and I used them over the weekend for hunting coyotes in western Utah. During the hunt the weather went from rain to snow to sun, and I can say that these had no issues at all. The lenses stayed clear and focusing was almost as good as my vortex binos that I paid 5x more for. carying case is a little hokey but nothing that a good bino holster cant fix. All in all I am glad that my brother was happy with his present and we were able to test them in 3 types of weather. I hope they stand up to the test of time. Worth the investment of 32.99.
Whilst the size of the objective lens determines to a large degree how much light can enter the binoculars, it does not completely determine how much light enters your eyes, which is far more important. A measurement known as the Exit Pupil gives you the width of the column of light exiting the eye-piece and is calculated by dividing the Objective Lens size by the Magnification of the binoculars.
I am a fairly new birder and purchased Nikon Monarch M511 8x42 6.3 waterproof binoculars about 2 years ago from B&H. While I was in Equador this spring the side hinge where I attached my Nikon harness broke on the left side. I have no means of atttaching them now to the harness. I have enjoyed these as effective "starter" binoculars. With the loss of the capacity to wear my harness, I am considering upgrading. I would appreciate a suggestion for a new pair, as the broken part seems to be an integral part of the frame and not something that can be repaired. I would like to be able to see subtle colors, wing bars and eye ring color at the same or greater distance than I can with the Monarchs. Waterproof, as light a weight as possible.
Convenience. It’s certainly more convenient to have both important devices combined. Imagine the situation where you spotted a prey and you would like to estimate it’s distance from you. When you took out your rangefinder device, it’s gone already. I bet you are going to be pretty frustrated. Furthermore, carrying both devices (that could be combined) during a hunting trip is just not wise.

The main reason why these are perfectly fine for astronomy is that they have mid-level or perhaps even high-level multicoated 50mm lenses. Unlike other low-priced models these truly deliver the brightness and sharpness you need when stargazing at night. The optics are simply remarkable for this price range. There is no distortion on the sides of the image and the focusing mechanism operates smoothly every time.
Digiscoping The use of digiscoping adapters has seen an increase in recent years, since just about every phone in everyone’s pocket is equipped with a camera. These adapters, either binocular, phone-specific or (growing in popularity) universal fit, allow you to mount your phone on one of the eyepieces and take photos of the magnified view. Depending on the manufacturer, these adapters can be made of plastic or metal with varying degrees of usability options. The good news is that as the hobby grows, more and more options are made available so you can spend as much or as little you want.
Moving on with our list, we have the USCAMEL 10×50 binoculars. Compared to the Bushnell above, you will find that these are significantly cheaper however, you shouldn’t let the price deter you. They’re a great pair of binoculars, and they’ve proven to work wonders in quite a few situations. Their price only indicates that they’re actually a good choice if they’re your first pair, or if you need a new pair but can’t really afford a high-end one. You may not be able to compare them to high-end pairs with their performance, but as mentioned, the price is also not really comparable. They’re often found in reviews because they do have quite a bit to offer.
Completely water and weather-proof, the system is purged with nitrogen to provide advanced anti-fogging in any viewing conditions. They are also shock-resistant thanks to the rubber-coated body and are one of the sturdiest range finding binoculars you can buy. For their great construction quality, durability, as well as superior image quality, the USCAMEL HD Binoculars set makes for a powerful optical tool that you will be able to use for years to come.
We did include a few of these on our list. When this is your requirement, there’s a list of things that need to be checked in order to get the most out of the binoculars. First of all, you’ll need them to be waterproof and fog proof. Having them float is a nice addition too. Waterproofing is pretty much a given with them, and they’re commonly filled with nitrogen so the lenses don’t fog up on the inside – this is a great thing and a must in this situation. The models commonly have lower magnification, such as 7x, because with higher magnification you’ll get a pretty blurry image. Image stabilization is a great option here – if you have it, you could go higher than 7x, and still have a crisp image.

Technically, the type of prism utilized in binoculars is a double-Porro prism, but is always shortened to just “Porro.” It is also always capitalized because it is the last name of the inventor, Ignazio Porro, who designed this prism system around 1850. This most basic of prism configurations is defined by the folded light path, which displaces the point where the light enters and exits the prism, which results in the familiar look of a “traditional” or “old-school” binocular.
All three of these binos have superb optical quality, and all three earned perfect scores in our clarity in brightness testing. If we really split hairs, we would say that the Swarovski bins are just slightly brighter than the other two, and possibly just a tad clearer as well. However, we're talking about differences of maybe a percentage point or less, the kind of differences you can notice in our very controlled, side-by-side tests, no the kind of difference you'll notice when you throw your bins up to your eyes because you think you might have spotted a Kirtland's warbler. Bottom line, if you're willing to spend $2500+ on a pair of binos, you're going to get top-notch optics regardless of the brand you choose.

Like every set of binoculars, astronomy binoculars will have two main features: magnification and the objective lens size. So for example, if the binoculars are 10×50 it means they have 10x magnification and 50mm objective lenses. The secret to choosing the perfect night time binoculars is getting the right balance between magnification and lens size that will result in a clear, bright and stable image.

If your main interest in astronomy is exploring the fine details on planets or showing structure in distant galaxies, you will probably also eventually want to get a telescope as binoculars just don't have enough magnification. However, binoculars have their advantages over telescopes for astronomy and a wide field of view is one of them. If are new to astronomy or if you thrive on large open star clusters and big, extended nebulae, binoculars can actually work better for you than a telescope. It is often said that binoculars are the best "first telescopes" you can buy and even an experienced astronomer usually keeps one with them at all times.
Which are all crucial considerations, as binoculars tend to be highly subjective. It’s helpful to think of a pair as you might a new car: you want a rare symbiotic union of stylistic penchants, pragmatic details and clarity of vision that all mesh with whatever price point you’re willing to live with. Because the moment you drive it off the lot, the resale value craps out. There’s no monolithic pair that everyone should own, no starter set that’s worth the $200 you could just apply towards pricier lifetime binoculars. While cost is often a barometer of quality, it’s not always. Instead, a thornier set of metrics obtains: are you after high magnification for long-range birding — owls and shorebirds and the like — or will 7x or 8x suffice? Do you want a lightweight pair to stow in your glove compartment, carry-on or briefcase? How important is balance, overall feel, focus, and what birders call “eye relief” (basically visual ergonomics) to you? Because they’re different for everyone. In short, will you be driving an Audi 6 or a Ford Fusion?

It can also handle some of the toughest ranging scenarios with a small beam divergence. The model has exceptional optical quality that results in clarity beyond 1,400 yards. This is due to the fluoride glass used for its optics. The Victory RF is designed with comfort in mind as it features large easy-to-press buttons that click when pressed. The Zeiss Victory RF costs $3,300 for this 10×56 model and less than $3,000 for the 10×45.


I am an avid outdoorsman with experience in naturalist education, outside adventure education, ski instruction, and writing. In addition to my outdoor hobbies, I’m a huge fan of punk rock. I have launched several start-ups. (or business ventures) When exploring the backcountry, I usually carry less than 10 pounds of gear. Years of experience have taught me to pack light. I enjoy sharing my experiences of backcountry education teaching and guiding through writing.

Edge Sharpness: All binoculars have a “sweet spot” in the centre of the field of view where the image is in sharpest focus before some loss of sharpness as you move out towards the image edge (a phenomenon known as field curvature). The wider this central sweet spot, the more enjoyable the binoculars will be to use. The better the binoculars, the larger the sweet spot, and the less softening you get as you approach the image periphery. Some premium binoculars (like Swarovski’s flagship EL Swarovision range), incorporate special “field flattener” lenses in the eyepieces to deliver a clear view right to the edge of the field.


Sky&Telescope has just released a new, slightly expanded edition of my book, Binocular Highlights. The original had been out for ten years and sold very well, so instead of simply doing another print run, they opted for a new edition. I was happy to help out and select ten new “highlights” for inclusion. Continue reading “Binocular Highlights 2nd Edition Now Available”
I initially thought these would only benefit prairie land outfitters, or those who guide hunts out in the vast open. If you think about it, the guide can monitor the range on the targeted animal while not having to take his eyes off of it. There would be no need to constantly switch between a rangefinder and a pair of binoculars, therefore a combo would be ideal for that type of situation.
“I originally bought this for my 6-year-old grandson but when I received them I decided to give them to my 10-year-old grandson. These binoculars have weight to them not like cheap plastic ones I have bought for grandchildren before. They are easy to use. Clear to see through and lightweight. They are worth more than I paid for them. My husband has tried them out and said he wouldn’t mind having a pair.”
The type and quality of the glass used for the lenses and prisms matter. Generic optical glass may have imperfections, and if it isn’t ground and polished correctly, it could bend light oddly, causing colors to look skewed or prevent its ability to achieve tack-sharp focusing, or you may notice distortion at the edges. Specialized glass, such as low dispersion or extra low dispersion, is engineered to have virtually no distortion and transmit light better without bending it. The resulting images are generally clearer, sharper, with true color rendition and higher contrast.
For a trusty pair of binoculars that are super portable, the Pentax AD are best for casual use like short hikes or travel. While they're not made for birdwatching or stargazing, they're perfect for throwing into a bag and going on a spontaneous adventure. You'll still get full performance with their compact size, making them a great pair to keep in your purse or bag at all times.

So what makes the Victory’s the cream of the crop? They do sport the largest objective lenses on our list with about the same level of zoom. You’re going to notice a difference in zoom quality between the Victory’s and a pair of 10x42mm’s. Zeiss ensures that with this pair of binos, in particular, you’re getting unparalleled quality through carefully coated lenses.

These binoculars features a large field of view with a 25mm objective lens and 10x magnification. The binos even feature a low light level night vision mode that can capture brilliant images at more than 1,000 yards away without giving up detail or clarity during the day or night. At a very inexpensive price point, you really can’t go wrong with this pick.
When my wife came along, we upgraded to a pair of Steiner binoculars (now lost) and lived briefly in a new visual milieu, utterly fresh and imposing. Things appeared as they never had before. Being owl people, our birding gestalt began to follow an inexorable course toward higher magnification, all the way up to 10x. We’re also urbanites with a young child and do 90 percent of our birding from our porch at sunup, with nuthatches and chickadees flitting about in a hazed cityscape, so we also like a wider 8x field of view. Though slightly less broke, we drool over the sale bins at Target. We’re also fairly lazy, it must be admitted, and would prefer our binoculars to be as light as cotton, and for someone else to do the lifting.
If you aren’t well versed in binoculars and what the terminology means, you might be fooled into buying something that’s absolutely not worth the money. Not all premium binoculars are worth buying, and there are some budget offerings that can absolutely hold their own against competition that’s often a couple times more expensive. You will find a lot of choices, but going for the right one is a challenge in itself. Therefore, below you will find a guide that touches on the basics, what to look out for, and where it’s actually worth investing a few extra dollars.
Another winner on our list comes from Barska. It is called the Deep Sea Floating Binocular and brings waterproof technology and optical image quality to a new level. Designed to operate in any imaginable environment, they are completely protected from the elements thanks to high-end o-ring seals and nitrogen-purged optics for fog-free viewing. Offering a 7X magnification and a 50mm lens diameter, the reasonable priced Barska will seriously compete with the best range finding binoculars on the planet, thanks to BAK-4 prisms and advanced, multi-coated optics.
Though a bit on the portly side at 23.6 ounces, there’s a simplicity of design and ease of use that’s hugely gratifying in the field. This may sound like small potatoes, but the tethered lens covers and rain guard are far and away the best I’ve ever come across. Most require substantial wrestling, while these slide right on and off. For what it’s worth, I also didn’t have a minor cardiac event while adjusting the neck strap. With a field of view upwards of 340 feet at 1,000 yards, and amped-up magnification for long-range birding, the Ranger EDs feel like a rare triumph of design over wallet slenderness.
Having said that the gap between the leading tier of €1,000 plus binoculars and some of their more affordable competition is closing. Optical technologies, techniques and components pioneered by premium European manufacturers have become more widely available and affordable, and production standards in the far east have improved to the point where manufacturers are mass-producing some remarkably good optics.

I know that some museums, like the Louvre or Musee d'Orsay, are well lit - while some parts of Versailles, cathedrals and churches like the Sistine Chapel - are a bit dim (almost dark)...so if you can handle a bino larger than a compact (up to 25mm objective lens diameter) you may want to think about upping the size to a 30-40mm to help make the view brighter if you know the rooms will have challenging lighting.


The Fusion ranges out just a tad less than its competitors, but nevertheless, it’s still a full 1,760 yards – a complete one mile. Bushnell is straight-up with its specs as they disclose that its soft-target ranging is only 500 yards. While that might seem on the low side for a high-powered and expensive optic, we do appreciate the truth of its abilities. However, 500 yards is still pretty, doggone far!
“We are REALLY impressed with the quality of the Aurosport 10x25's. While they have a lower magnification than the Nikon Travelights, they are not short on quality at about 1/3 the price. We have several months yet before we will use them for spotting wildlife, but are confident that we made the right choice in purchasing these and will recommend them to anyone who asks us about them. In summary - an OUTSTANDING product for the money.”
Another way to express the viewing angle is the Apparent Angle of View (AAoV). This is roughly calculated by taking the AoV and multiplying it by the magnification. So if that 10x42 binocular from the earlier example has a 6.3-degree AoV, its apparent angle of view is 63 degrees. The AAoV is the angle of the magnified field when you look through binoculars; so the larger the apparent field of view is, the wider the field of view you can see even at high magnifications. Generally speaking, an AAoV of more than 60 degrees is considered wide-angle. Nikon engineers developed their own mathematical formula to determine AAoV (see below) more accurately and precisely, which lowers the angle on average, but most of the optics industry continues to use the first formula for consistency and simplicity.
In general astronomical binoculars should not really be thought of as a substitute for a telescope, rather you should think of them as something to be used along with your scope, especially when you want to get a wider field of view and see more of the sky at once. But to give you an idea of what kind of things you can see, the observations below were made whilst using the great value Celestron SkyMaster 25x70 Binoculars on a night with an almost full moon and a fair amount of light pollution:
Pick the units with round exit pupils; this tells you that quality prisms were used and that you're getting all the light you should. (You can also check the specification sheet: the best prisms are made from BAK-4 glass, while others use BK-7 glass.) Since they're hidden inside, the prisms are one of the first things manufacturers skimp on when trying to lower the price. Seeing "shaded" or "squared off" exit pupils is a sign of lesser-quality or undersized prisms.
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