Efficiency is the word which can describe this product. Bushnell know for their high-quality products have come up with a rangefinder binocular which is going to be one of the rangefinders on which the coming generation will be modeled on. It is a model which blends the quality of binoculars which the capabilities of the laser rangefinder. Starting with the range, it can measure from 10 to 1760 yards. It operates on a push of a button. The ease of use with this product is unbelievable. It is used for multiple activities such as hunting, outdoor sports, bird and wildlife watching, traveling, and even by the army. It is a multi-purpose rangefinder binocular which is made using high-quality materials.
The Leica Geovid HD-B is an advanced model with a versatility that can handle target shooting and hunting. The model features automatic adjusting that alters ballistics based on the atmospheric conditions when in use. It also has fantastic optics with the ability to view targets clearly at over 1,500 yards. Its field of view is 300 feet even at 1,000 yards.

The Razor HD is argon-filled and sealed with O-rings to ensure reliable and durable protection against dust, debris, fog and water. It is rubber armored for non-slip and durable protection, and is equipped with a large focusing knob that is easy to use even while wearing gloves. Naturally contoured to perfectly fit your hands, promoting comfort and eliminating user-fatigue Vortex has once again created a winning combination of features.
When you’re new to stargazing, the first step seems obvious: buy a new telescope. But what will serve you just as well is a good pair of binoculars for astronomy. Binoculars bring the stars a bit closer to your eyes, with a larger field of view that makes the heavens a bit easier to understand. And even a good pair of binoculars will generally be cheaper than a new telescope. Browse the articles below for some tips on choosing the best binoculars for astronomy. You’ll also find articles that cover binocular basics, introducing you to the terms that you’ll need to know when you buy.

A lot of the discussion on the general internet tends to be one brand against another with very little reason as to why. Also most forum users only own one pair, so it very much becomes a sample-of-one. Your atricle puts all the main concepts together allowing the prospective buyer to at least understand all the jargon and also filtering out the marketing gumf which so often misleads (aircraft-grade, being a prime example).
For a premium experience while hunting or birdwatching, the Vortex Optics Viper HD Roof Prism Binoculars are the pair for you. Their massive 50mm objective lenses offer high-end performance with a full-size feel and edge-to-edge clarity. The binoculars also magnify at an impressive 12x, with a field of view of 288 feet at 1,000 yards. They're also built with lifetime fog and waterproofing performance with ultra-hard scratch resistant armortek protection.
Beyond those specific models, I would say look at a bino that's larger than 42mm up to 56mm - anything larger than that and they're going to be heavy and awkward to use. I'd also keep the magnification at around 7x-8x - that will ensure a large exit pupil (especially with the bigger objective models) and will help offset the dimming of the view that can happen to high-power optics especially in challenging light. Here's a link to some search results that can help you narrow your choices. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?setNs=p_PRICE_2%7c1&Ns=p_PRICE_2%7c1&ci=1010&fct=fct_magnification_156%7c7x%2bfct_magnification_156%7c8x%2bfct_objective-lens-diameter_1126%7c50mm%2bfct_objective...
Lens coatings are films applied to lens surfaces to reduce glare and reflections, increase light transmission and contrast, and help make colors look more vivid. Any light reflected is light that never reaches the viewer’s eyes, so by eliminating reflections, the image ends up being brighter and sharper. Coatings, in general, are good, provided that the coatings do something. It’s easy to put a cheap coating on a lens to give it a cool-looking orange tint, but the coating might not do anything to improve image quality. If you aren’t able to test a pair of binoculars before buying, the best you can do is research the brand, look for user reviews, and ask questions before you buy.
Hi Mark, I found the 60 x 60 binoculars for about $50-80. They look pretty poorly built. I also found a pair of 60 x 90’s for just over $110 and they don’t look much better either. I think anything larger than 12 x 50 is hard to handhold and anything over 15 x 70 is impossible. Not sure why people wanting that much magnification don’t go for a spotting scope? 
Celestron has designed this model to meet the demands of extended astronomical or terrestrial viewing sessions and the 25×70 version is one of the most popular models in the Skymaster series. They offer large aperture light gathering and so open up more stargazing opportunities and are relatively light but include an adapter so they can be used with a standard camera tripod.
Observing with both eyes not only feels more natural, but your brain can actually form a better image when when using the "information" sent to it from both eyes. I have written more about this phenomenon in the section entitled "Two eyes are Better than one" in this article on Observation Binoculars with Angled Eyepieces if you are interested to learn more.
The Celestron TrailSeeker binoculars are great for gathering light and delivering fantastic optical resolution with their 42mm lens and 8x magnification, the industry standard for a good pair of binoculars. While some of the image edges might suffer from blurring, these binoculars will still give you a wonderful and wide field of view for less than $200. And with their lightweight magnesium alloy body, you know you’re going to get something durable, waterproof, and high-quality for the outdoors or in a stadium setting.

Contrast: the higher the contrast in the image you see through your binoculars, the better. A high contrast image will have more “snap”, and makes it much easier to pick out fainter objects at distance. It also helps you to differentiate between subtle variations in tone and hue, particularly at lower light levels. Contrast is largely impacted by the quality of the lenses and prisms in the optical design, their accurate alignment to reduce or eliminate internal reflection, and of course the quality of the lens and prism coatings (again). Outstanding contrast is one of the hallmarks that gives premium binoculars that elusive “Wow!” factor.


ED or HD lenses: Extra-low Dispersion (ED) or High Density (HD) lenses are used in the objective lens elements of premium binoculars and spotting scopes. Their principal purpose  is to correct for a phenomenon called “chromatic aberration”… or colour fringing. Colour fringing can be an issue with standard binoculars, particularly when viewing high contrast subjects (light subjects against a dark background and vice versa). ED or HD glass reduces or eliminates colour fringing, improving the perceived sharpness, contrast and colour fidelity of the resulting image.
You’ll want to start your moon-gazing when the moon is just past new – and visible as a waxing crescent in the western sky after sunset. At such times, you’ll have a beautiful view of earthshine on the moon.  This eerie glow on the moon’s darkened portion is really light reflected from Earth onto the moon’s surface.  Be sure to turn your binoculars on the moon at these times to enhance the view. 
Another consideration are fixed focus binoculars (sometimes mistakenly referred to as auto focus binoculars, or sometimes slightly more accurately described as focus free or always in focus binoculars) These have a very large depth of view and once you have adjusted them to your eyesight, which only needs to be done once, they will be permanently in focus from a given distance to infinity. The obvious advantage of this is that you never have to change focus, which in terms of speed can't be beaten. On the down side,depending on the distance of the bird from your position, you won't always get the sharpest of images. If you want to learn more read my article on self focusing binoculars.

Some binoculars have variable magnification. At first, this seems like the best of all worlds, but, in reality, you lose a lot of optical quality for the price point with zoom lens binoculars. If you ask around, you will be hard-pressed to find anyone who endorses zoom binoculars for birding. In fact, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology says succinctly, “Avoid ‘zoom’ binoculars.”


Extra Low Dispersion (ED) Glass: This is a high-quality glass that used to be only found in the top binoculars, but now is much more common across all price ranges. One of it’s best benefits is it helps reduce chromatic aberration – which is the inability of the lens to focus all the colors to a single point. It causes color fringing around the edges of the image.
Nikon's black 10x42 ProStaff 3S Binocular (B&H # NIPS3S10X42) features silver-alloy coated roof prisms and anti-reflection multi-coated optics that produces bright and clear high-contrast images with true color rendition across its entire field of view. To help offset visible hand-shake often associated with 10x power and higher optics, Nikon built this binocular with a wide 63° apparent angle of view to limit disorientation and improve the observational experience in most lighting conditions, and even in the most extreme weather. Whether you're hunting or birding, boating or watching your favorite team, this ProStaff will quickly become indispensable for all you're outdoor activities.
***Important Note: Most companies don’t reveal much detail when it comes to the below information. These are kept a secret so as not to lose a competitive advantage. For example, Zeiss has been in business a LONG time. They have perfected their engineering and coatings over many years and are not very willing to share their best practices with other companies!***
“I am SO thrilled with my new binoculars! I ordered the Compact 8x32s. I’d call them semi-compact. Bigger (and much higher quality) than my super-compact pocket ones and yet perfect to take along in a bag or on a belt. I’ve had them a week and I’ve gotten familiar with them and had a chance to use them as well. They look great AND they show things at a distance well, crisp! They are comfortable to hold with an indentation in the nonslip finish for each thumb. I have a problem with the finish on, and eye cups of, many binoculars as most are latex. But these don’t smell like tires and they don’t bother me. In the center, they adjust to the width between the eyes. And they have a right eye diopter which allows for the difference between most people’s eyes.”
The Bushnell Legend 8×42 give you great color depth and clarity for the price, and is my choice as the best budget birding binoculars. If you are coming from cheaper pairs costing less than $150, you will be surprised at the upgrade you get for about 1.5x the price. At 8x, its magnification is smaller than other 10x budget pairs, but when you look through it, you won’t be disappointed by the view.
Which Monarch are you looking at? There are three models in the series: 7, 5, & 3. The three is the basic model and performs great, it's not really on-par with the Zeiss...for that you'd need to go with the 7/5 as they get upgrades over the 3 with extra low-dispersion glass, and phase-corrected dielectric coated prisms so there won't be any color fringing and the resolutiona and contrast will be greatly improved. The main difference between the 7 & 5 is that the 7 has a wide field of view to present you with a really immersive observational experience.
The latest product from this direct-to-consumer optics brand is a big 15X configured for open-country hunters. The B.4’s lightweight polymer chassis makes it lighter than it looks, and a mid-frame ridge offers great purchase for those who hand-hold the binocular. While our test model was in plain black and gray, buyers can dress this optic up in their choice of camo patterns and colors for an additional fee. The optics were a little disappointing, and testers gave demerits for the boxy, overlarge eyecups. But the price is fair for a big, albeit niche, bino.
I know that some museums, like the Louvre or Musee d'Orsay, are well lit - while some parts of Versailles, cathedrals and churches like the Sistine Chapel - are a bit dim (almost dark)...so if you can handle a bino larger than a compact (up to 25mm objective lens diameter) you may want to think about upping the size to a 30-40mm to help make the view brighter if you know the rooms will have challenging lighting.
Decide on your price range. Top-of-the-line binoculars give you a pristine image in a comfortable, durable package. Lower price ranges also offer some great options, thanks to technological advances in the last decade. See our chart of Performance vs. Quality Index to look for your best value. Note that we provide MSRP (from October 2013), but many retailers sell binoculars at below this price.

The down side to long eye relief is that it usually reduces the field of view. Some people wonder if you need to wear glasses at all using binoculars, well If you are near-sighted or far-sighted, you can use your binoculars without wearing glasses and the binoculars focus will compensate, but if you have astigmatism, you will need to use your glasses.
Which Monarch are you looking at? There are three models in the series: 7, 5, & 3. The three is the basic model and performs great, it's not really on-par with the Zeiss...for that you'd need to go with the 7/5 as they get upgrades over the 3 with extra low-dispersion glass, and phase-corrected dielectric coated prisms so there won't be any color fringing and the resolutiona and contrast will be greatly improved. The main difference between the 7 & 5 is that the 7 has a wide field of view to present you with a really immersive observational experience.
We can’t really recommend any binoculars that cost under $100; those tend to have very poor optics and aren’t durable enough to survive hard knocks without coming out of alignment. But for just a bit more, the very functional Carson VP pair offers excellent optics, a minimum focus distance 10 feet closer than the Nikon ProStaff 5, and rugged waterproof and fogproof construction.
We expected this boxy, two-tone binocular from Cabela’s to cost so much more than its asking price of $190. Mechanically and stylistically, it seems like an optic that might compete with $1,000 offerings from European brands. We liked the Intensity’s crisp two-position eyecups and oversize focus wheel, front-hinge tripod adapter, fine balance and hand-gripping texture, and high-quality nylon carry case. By delivering all those features for under $200, the Cabela’s bino wins our Great Buy award.

Most binoculars have center focus, meaning that you focus both barrels at once by turning a knob or a rocker in the center. This is great for when the distance of your target often changes, such as in birdwatching, or when you often pass the binoculars for astronomy back and forth between people. But the night sky always stays at infinity focus, and you're probably observing it alone. So
Some people report success holding the end of the left barrel with the right hand, and letting the right barrel rest on the wrist, and then pushing them gently against the head. This creates more rigid mechanics than holding the binoculars for astronomy closer to the eyepieces. I've had limited success with this, so try it yourself and see what you think.
Also concerning zoom binoculars stay away from them. Zoom binoculars show up in greater numbers for repairs than any other design. They were originally developed as a “gimmick” to encourage sales simulating the success of sales of zoom camera lenses.U.S. military specification design is still the best design for binoculars, although not as popular as the center focus design. If someone is advertising their binoculars as “military design binoculars, just make sure they are U.S. military design and not someone else’s military. U.S. military specification design means that each eyepiece has to be focused for each eye, that the barrels of the binocular are sealed or water proofed, and filled with nitrogen, prisms are Bak-4, and the lens are fully multi-coated.Center focus binoculars are not usually water proofed and filled with nitrogen. You achieve focus with a center focus wheel and the right eye piece for the right eye. For a good center focus binocular make sure the prisms are Bak-4 and the lens are fully multicoated.
The Leica 8X42 Geovid is an all-around excellent range finding binocular that delivers outstanding performance when you need it. In addition to its stunning range of view and excellent optical clarity, the 8X42 offers unparalleled ballistics information at the push of a button thanks to the binoculars' patented advanced ballistics compensation technology which allows you to record and obtain proper rifle ranges. It is perfect for hunting, hiking, and other outdoor activities.
The clear majority of binoculars use a center focus system. The main focus wheel is set on the bridge between the two oculars and moves them symmetrically. With center focusing, many manufacturers will have a dioptric adjustment dial on one of the eyepieces to fine-tune the focus to match individual optical prescriptions. The dioptric correction amount is decided by each manufacturer, usually by model, and can be on the left or right eye, or both. Certain models have the dioptric correction integrated into the center focusing mechanism.
When my wife came along, we upgraded to a pair of Steiner binoculars (now lost) and lived briefly in a new visual milieu, utterly fresh and imposing. Things appeared as they never had before. Being owl people, our birding gestalt began to follow an inexorable course toward higher magnification, all the way up to 10x. We’re also urbanites with a young child and do 90 percent of our birding from our porch at sunup, with nuthatches and chickadees flitting about in a hazed cityscape, so we also like a wider 8x field of view. Though slightly less broke, we drool over the sale bins at Target. We’re also fairly lazy, it must be admitted, and would prefer our binoculars to be as light as cotton, and for someone else to do the lifting.
Very bright, clear display with 4-step intensity adjustment; easily readable under any lighting conditions and against various subjects, with single or continuous measurement up to 8 seconds. Displays in increments of 0.1m/yd, when shorter than 100m/yds and in 1m/yd at 100m/yds and over. Auto power shut-off function saves battery life by shutting down after 8 seconds of non-use. (*For reference. Under Nikon’s Measurement conditions. The specifications of the product may not be achieved depending on the target object's shape, surface texture and nature, and/or weather conditions.)
Why do people even consider astronomy binoculars? When first getting interested in astronomy or searching for a gift for a young person, don't we usually ask "What kind of telescope shall I buy?" Of course, there are many different kinds of telescopes available from sources such as discount, hobby and department stores and usually each promises extraordinary celestial views.
It is 10 times harder to make a good roof prism binocular than a standard porro prism one. A roof prism binocular can equal, but never exceed an excellent quality porro prism binocular. A roof prism binocular is also much more expensive than a porro prism binocular due to the special prism and phase shift coatings used for this design. Of course, it does not mean a well made roof prism binocular is not good for astronomy. It is just more expensive due to the high standards required to make one.
What is also interesting is they accept the standard, 1.25-inch astronomical filters to enhance your views of the Moon, planets nebulae and other celestial bodies. Other features include fully multi-coated lenses, quality BAK-4 prisms, individual focus for precise adjustment. They are fully waterproof and nitrogen-purged to prevent any fogging up. They're also backed by Zhumell's 25-year warranty.
Most roof prism binoculars are made in Germany. Porro prism binoculars are made in Japan. Whatever design you choose make sure the binocular has Bak-4 prisms and the lens is fully multi-coated. Also because it is a well known European brand does not mean it is safe to buy that binocular. Some binoculars are shipped to Germany from Korea with no country of origin marked on the binoculars. When said binoculars left Germany they were then stamped as being made in Germany. On a similar note, if buying binoculars made in either the former Soviet Union or China you might be getting a good deal, but buyer beware. If you can, try them out first and make sure the dealer has a liberal return policy.
A related consideration is the exit pupil, the size of the little round disk of light that you see floating in the air behind the eyepieces when you hold the binoculars out in front of you toward a bright sky or a bright indoor wall. The size of the exit pupil is an important factor that's often overlooked. To determine it, just divide the aperture by the magnification — and luckily these are inscribed right there on the back facing you. For example, 7x50 binoculars have about a 7-mm exit pupil, while 10x50s have a 5-mm exit pupil.
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