Binocular stargazing is full of surprises. Sometimes you stumble across a pretty cluster and wonder how you’d previously missed it. Other times, you hunt and hunt for a galaxy listed at 8th magnitude, only to come up empty handed. It’s enough to make you wonder — what makes one object a binocular standout and another difficult challenge? Compiled here are the five most important factors that determine whether or not a deep-sky wonder will turn out to be binocular trash or treasure.
We loved the eyecups on the Swarovski and Zeiss models. Both use threaded eyecups that twist in and out and have very conspicuous stopping points, so you can be sure both eye cups are set on the same depth. The Lecia bins also use threaded eyecups, but the stopping points aren't as solid, and we often had trouble getting both cups set to the same depth. This was particularly annoying when sharing the bins amongst multiple testers with different eyecup preferences, as it took much more finagling to get the eyecups to an acceptable and even setting.
The best part is, even after three years whereby the premium warranty is reverted to limited lifetime warranty, Leica Geovid promises to service/repair your binocular for only $35 irrespective of the actual cost of repairing for your whole life. $35 is pretty reasonable considering the fact that the materials used in Leica Geovid are high quality ones.
There are multiple advantages of binoculars for birders over the other optical options. Binoculars are much more portable and lighter than spotting scopes and large telephoto camera lenses. Also, binoculars afford you a more natural “3D view” of the bird, since you are looking through two optical tubes and, therefore, viewing the birds with both eyes. Human vision is stereoscopic and sighting through two optical devices gives a birder the most natural view. Last, many spotting scopes and telephoto lenses require the use of a tripod or alternative support to ensure a steady view. This requires the birder to carry more gear into the field on expeditions.
From January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2011, Celestron offered a No Fault Warranty on all binoculars and spotting scopes. For a charge of $25 for binoculars and $35 for spotting scopes, any binocular or spotting scope would be repaired or replaced with the same or similar product at the sole discretion of Celestron regardless of how the binoculars or spotting scope were damaged or rendered unusable. The customer must be the original owner, provide proof of purchase, and return the binoculars or spotting scope prepaid to Celestron.

We’re in the business of matching our customers with the perfect astronomy binocular, mount and accessories for their needs. Whether you already know what you’re looking for, or need some help to determine which of our products best fits your specific situation, we have the knowledge and experience to give you the advice you need. We’re amateur astronomers, with thorough knowledge of our products, as well as the night sky. Our approach is to teach and educate, without sales pressure, to help you make the best choice. If we think a competitor’s product might better suite your requirements, we’ll tell you so. So if you have questions, please feel free to contact us by phone or email- we’re here to help.


The build quality is on point, with a rubber coated body, obviously made to last. Holding them is pretty easy as they’re grippy, and shock resistance is enough in those few cases where you might need it. The body is IPX7 waterproof, and completely sealed. There’s more useful stuff on the inside, as they’re full of nitrogen gas. What this means is that even under some extreme situations and weather conditions, the lenses won’t fog up. The prism is BAK4, similar to the other options, and you get the same sharp and vivid images, which let you see all the details of the object you’re looking at.
A lot of the discussion on the general internet tends to be one brand against another with very little reason as to why. Also most forum users only own one pair, so it very much becomes a sample-of-one. Your atricle puts all the main concepts together allowing the prospective buyer to at least understand all the jargon and also filtering out the marketing gumf which so often misleads (aircraft-grade, being a prime example).
3. First, view the moon with binoculars. When you start to stargaze, you’ll want to watch the phase of the moon carefully. If you want to see deep-sky objects inside our Milky Way galaxy – or outside the galaxy – you’ll want to avoid the moon. But the moon itself is a perfect target for beginning astronomers, armed with binoculars. Hint: the best time to observe the moon is in twilight. Then the glare of the moon is not so great, and you’ll see more detail.

The Legend L-Series from Bushnell were built with everyone in mind, from the highly advanced to the novice. The all-black magnesium finish with large 42mm diameter lens can bring in as much daylight as possible, while its 8x magnification brings images in with crisp detail. It features all-weather durability with Bushnell’s own RainGuard HD coating with a field of view that reaches up to 426 feet of distance. 

Olaf Soltau, a member of the New York Chapter of the Audubon Society, shared his experiences and opinion: “I use Swarovski EL 10x42s. But it took years before I felt ready to move up from 8x to 10x. For beginners, I always suggest 8x40. Think Goldilocks: not too strong, not too weak, not too heavy, not too flimsy. It's simply the best compromise. Higher magnification makes the image too shaky and the birds too hard to find, especially for beginning birders. Lower magnification simply doesn't bring the birds close enough. There are, of course, exceptions. 10x40s are OK if most birding takes place in wide open spaces like grasslands and coastlines, where the birds are often far away. I used 8x40s for years until my hand had gotten steady enough and my bird-finding-through-binos skills had become good enough for 10x40s. Another exception: People who don't have the physical strength to carry 8x40s around all day long can opt for 8x30s, but that means sacrificing image quality.”


Seek out fellow birdwatchers and ask their thoughts. Birding clubs are all over the Internet—and they take their hobby seriously. Find a club or message board devoted to birding, and load up on questions to ask. You may get varied opinions on different products, but the insight should provide you with an expanded knowledge base when it comes time to make your selection.
Voted as the best binocular of 2016 by Best Binoculars Reviews, it is a device which has lived up to its potential. The EL series from Swarovski has been a mainstay for many years with the brand improving up on the models with the latest technologies. The changes with each version have been small, but the impact it has made on the ease of use and comfort is enormous. Starting with the design, the cutaway portion delivers a great place to hold the binocular securely. They have used magnesium alloy to manufacture the chassis, which is far more expensive than the aluminum or polycarbonate plastic frames. But the robustness the magnesium alloy brings to the table is incomparable.
Notably both the Nikon Monarch 5 8x42 and the Vortex Diamondback 8x42 also earned scores of 8 out of 10 in our clarity testing. This is impressive considering that both modles list for less than $300. While these model both have slightly more edge blurring than the top scoring products, they generally provide a super crisp, immersive image, allowing us to easily pick out all the minute, defining features of our bird models.

Continuing the trend of good options for the budget-minded individuals, we have the BARSKA Deep Sea 7×50 binoculars. Similar in style to the previous two offerings, this pair is excellent for water lovers and boating enthusiasts. They offer a similar set of functionalities as the previous two binoculars with rangefinders on our list, but their style and color choice is a bit different. They don’t have that green, military style, but instead come in a black and blue color combination. Nevertheless, they look pretty good.

First, pick up several binoculars and look at their objective (front) lenses. Do this with a bright white light coming over your shoulder from behind. You'll notice right away that in some objective lenses, the reflection of the light will be brighter than in others. Pick the models with the reflections that look darkest (and no doubt deeply colored); this is a sign of quality lens coatings. Good coatings increase the transmission of light through the glass and reduce the amount of scattered light hazing the view.


Now, as far as rangefinders are concerned, the most popular size is 7×50. There are sometimes 10×42, or in Zeiss’ Victory, 10×56. These are all numbers that you could go for. However, less than 7 times magnification won’t do the job. On the other hand, more than 10x, and you won’t be able to get as much light to your eyes, and the image will be darker. As far as the objective lens size goes, if you can’t mount the binoculars on a tripod, you will need something with an objective lens not larger than Zeiss’ 56mm, as it will be heavy and difficult to handle.


Field of View is expressed as feet at a thousand yards. This is fine if you are in the artillery, but astronomers use degrees to define the field of view. If you see on your binoculars a field of view 316 feet at a thousand yards, it means the field of view is 316 feet from edge to edge in your binoculars. To convert this to astronomical field of view or degrees divide by 53. In this case 316 divided by 53 equals 5.96 or 6.0 degrees field of view.
Optically, the TrailSeeker offered exceptional light-gathering abilities. I remember watching a northern harrier soaring against the sky and the colors of the streaks below were as sharp as can be. Another bonus is this pair’s ability to focus close—as near as 6.5 feet, with a field of view of 426 feet at 1,000 yards. However, the outer edges of that expansive field of view had some mild distortion. The streaks on a Lincoln’s sparrow got a little mushy through the edges of the Celestron lenses, yet remained razor-sharp through the lenses of the Athlon Optics Midas ED. Most users probably won’t notice this, but the Athlons were clearly superior, to my trained eye.
Eyecups on the binoculars ensure that your eyes will be at the correct distance, but if you wear glasses, you can't get your eyes as close to the lenses, so you need to adjust the eyecups to ensure that even with your glasses on your eyes are the correct distance from the ocular lenses. Binoculars with a longer eye relief are ideal for those who wear glasses as they basically project the image further beyond the ocular lens, giving you plenty of room to play with. So if you wear glasses, you should be looking for an eye relief of at least 15mm, to see the full image full image.
Small yet mind-blowingly effective, the new LRB 6000CI are perfect for anyone looking for high-quality range finding binoculars. Combining GPS measurements with range finding metrics, they will accurately measure distances of up to 4,000 yards in a fraction of a second. These binoculars have such a dizzying array of features related to optical range finding that they can even compete with pro-level military equipment.
This might seem like an odd thing to consider, since the whole idea of a binocular is to look at things that are far away; and for most users this is absolutely true. However, there are a fair number of enthusiasts who use their binocular for bird watching or insect observation. Many bird watchers like to have a close minimum focus distance that can allow them to see minute detail of birds—like wing bars, beak shape, or crown markings—while birds are feeding. A close focus of less than 6' for a full-size binocular is noteworthy. Typically, as magnification is increased, the minimum focus distance also increases. For users interested in a short close-focus distance, they should look at larger objectives and keep the magnification at around 8x.
Ballistic Functions: Ballistics curves are essential for getting proper information from the rangefinder unit, and customizable ballistics information is ideal. Many units come with pre-programmed ballistics charts that also allow the user to enter their own specific information. Some models even feature automatic adjustment of the ballistics curves based on changes in the atmosphere.
Hopefully you found the information included above to be useful. You can use all of the information to streamline your decision-making process as to whether or not you want to purchase rangefinder binoculars, and also use it to better educate yourself about this technology – as well as others. They are definitely incredible tools, but may or may not be useful in your specific circumstance or situation.
The Legend L-Series from Bushnell were built with everyone in mind, from the highly advanced to the novice. The all-black magnesium finish with large 42mm diameter lens can bring in as much daylight as possible, while its 8x magnification brings images in with crisp detail. It features all-weather durability with Bushnell’s own RainGuard HD coating with a field of view that reaches up to 426 feet of distance. 

Not all birding is done on sunny days. You will definitely want a pair of binoculars that is waterproof, as even fair-weather birders might get stuck in a passing rain shower from time to time. Fogproof is also a good feature to look for, as this will keep your binoculars from fogging up when transitioning to the outdoors on a cold day from a warm living room, where you were just perusing the latest Audubon magazine or Sibley guide.
There are still other denizens of the solar system you can capture through binocs. Look for the occasional comet, which appears as a fuzzy blob of light. Then there are the asteroids – fully 12 of them can be followed with binoculars when they are at their brightest. Because an asteroid looks star-like, the secret to confirming its presence is to sketch a star field through which it’s passing. Do this over subsequent nights; the star that changes position relative to the others is our solar system interloper.
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What these coatings do is to assist light transmission. It is important to note how the manufacturer describes their coatings as they are not all created equal. Ideally you want to see "Fully Multi-Coated" which means that all air to glass surfaces have received multiple layers of antireflection coatings. If you just see "Fully Coated" or "Multi-Coated" it means only some surfaces have coatings or they only have a single coating and thus will not perform anywhere near as well as Fully Multi-Coated binoculars assuming everything else is equal.
Barska's Battallion is a set of rangefinding binoculars that are sturdily made, offer fantastic optics, and can be bought at a great price. The rugged magnesium and aluminum frame is covered with a rubber coating for advanced shock resistance and optics protection. Offering an internal rangefinder with built-in compass, the binoculars provide great 8X magnification with a 30mm lens diameter.
“Took these binoculars to see Cavalia Odesseo from the nosebleed section and I must say they gave me an excellent view of the horses and acrobatics. I could easily see the violin soloist, the Spanish guitarist, and the enchanting vocalist behind the shrouds on the balconies. I will never watch a stage performance the same way again. I find that at a certain distance, I didn’t have to adjust the focus as often as I had expected. The focal sweet spot is pretty large. There is a mild chromatic aberration when viewing in daylight hours against the light, but this goes away when I fine tune the focus. For the price, these binoculars can’t be beat.”
Our runner-up, the Celestron TrailSeeker 8x42s, have rugged, armored construction and were among the lightest binoculars we tested, at 23 ounces (the Athlons weigh two ounces more). Celestron has been making high-quality consumer telescopes since the 1960s, but also offers a huge line of binoculars (over 14 lines, and more than 30 different models).
Now, the BinoX-HD are not typical night vision equipment. They aren’t your typical pair of rangefinder binoculars either. Typical night vision devices have image intensifier tubes, micro channel plates, or high sensitivity and improved frequency response. However, these have a charge-coupled device which provides the night vision capability. In terms of binoculars, typical ones tend to magnify the object by using a series of lenses. These, however, have a sensor – much like the one you’d find on a digital camera. When you’re looking at the object, it’s the sensor that magnifies the object between 4 and 16 times, and it does so digitally instead of optically. You can’t do wonders with it, such as zooming it at something that’s 1000 yards away at night, but the products that can do this are at least six or seven times the price.

They also have the added bonus in that they are far more versatile and you can use them for many other applications. If you plan to use this method, you should keep magnification below 12x in order to maintain steadiness. A good pair of binoculars with a magnification of 7x to 12x and a large objective lens will show you planets in our solar system, hundreds of star clusters, nebulae and even some galaxies.
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You’ll want to start your moon-gazing when the moon is just past new – and visible as a waxing crescent in the western sky after sunset. At such times, you’ll have a beautiful view of earthshine on the moon.  This eerie glow on the moon’s darkened portion is really light reflected from Earth onto the moon’s surface.  Be sure to turn your binoculars on the moon at these times to enhance the view. 


the quality of these binoculars is very good and the images are collimated correctly and very sharp.although the length is definitely an improvement over the giant style binoculars they’re still rather large and do require a tripod for steady viewing.my intention is to use these both for viewing wildlife in the daytime and the night sky. So far I’m very pleased.
In dark and poor light conditions, the maximum pupil size of a human eye is typically between 5mm to 9mm for people below 25 years of age (usually about 7mm) - this maximum size will also decrease slowly with age. So apart from the very small benefit of ease of use, there is not much point in an exit pupil larger than your pupil. But an exit pupil smaller than your pupil will mean that you will perceive the image as being dark.
The angle of view and field of view are basically the same. It is the measure of scenery which you can while looking through a rangefinder binocular. The angle of view is expressed in degrees. It can also be expressed in the form of Apparent Angle of View (AAOV). It can be measured by multiplying the magnification of the binocular with the Angle of view. The magnified field you see while looking through a binocular is the AAOV. So the field of view would be wider with an increase in AAOV. THE AAOV is considered to be wide if the angle is more than 60 to 65 degrees.
Recommendation: balance and handling is a very personal thing, but you should be able to get some idea of what the binoculars on your shortlist are like by reading reviews online from people who’ve spent time with the binoculars on your short-list. Try searching birding and wildlife forums (like Bird Forum) for recommendations by owners — and try and get to use as many different types of binocular as you can to see how different models and different styles feel to you (see point 10 on Try Before you Buy).
The lightweight housing is nitrogen-filled and O-ring sealed, enabling it to withstand use in wet and snowy weather without fogging when going from extreme temperature changes, and the rubberized armor offers protection from impacts while providing a slip-resistant grip. The Atrek's single-hinge closed-bridge design facilitates easy one-handed use, while the center focus wheel enables fast focusing. Twist-up eyecups makes it comfortable to use with or without eyewear.
The 7x50 configuration, tough body designed to withstand the elements as well as it's bright image, wide field of view and of course the rangefinding reticle, digital GPS and compass mark these Celestron binoculars out as the ideal companion for boaters, security and military personnel as well as hunters and especially those involved in search and rescue operations. 

The other important thing is the features you are expecting from the rangefinder binocular. No matter what others say, it is up to you to choose a particular rangefinder binocular. One feature which someone else finds useful might not be as useful for you. So, it depends on your perspective and requirement whether it will suit you or not. So, the thing you can do is note down the features you need from the rangefinder binocular. It will not only depend on your comfort, but also on the place and the occasions you use it for. It calls for a careful study of yourself and your needs. Getting to know your budget and knowing your requirements will get half the work done for you.


I have had several brand of laser rangefinders and I have the original Burris laser rangefinder / binocular combo which I have used for years, but recently decided to upgrade. I checked many brands out at retail stored like Cabelas and other sporting good stores including some that retail $3K or more. However for the money I think the Nikon can't be beat. It has a crisp clarity that the very expensive models have as far as using for binoculars but where it really shines is the laser rangefinder functionality. Other brands including some very expensive models seem to take many seconds to return a range reading. I'm sure it is not long but when you are sitting there trying to hold steady on a target 1500 yards plus away it seems like an eternity. The Nikon however is instantaneous on returning readings on anything under 1000 yards and maybe 1 sec on anything up to 1700 yards plus. Very impressed!

ED or HD lenses: Extra-low Dispersion (ED) or High Density (HD) lenses are used in the objective lens elements of premium binoculars and spotting scopes. Their principal purpose  is to correct for a phenomenon called “chromatic aberration”… or colour fringing. Colour fringing can be an issue with standard binoculars, particularly when viewing high contrast subjects (light subjects against a dark background and vice versa). ED or HD glass reduces or eliminates colour fringing, improving the perceived sharpness, contrast and colour fidelity of the resulting image.


“I originally bought this for my 6-year-old grandson but when I received them I decided to give them to my 10-year-old grandson. These binoculars have weight to them not like cheap plastic ones I have bought for grandchildren before. They are easy to use. Clear to see through and lightweight. They are worth more than I paid for them. My husband has tried them out and said he wouldn’t mind having a pair.”

Whilst it is true that these may not match the very high end "alpha" type instruments on this page, features like fully multi-coated optics, BaK-4 roof prisms with phase corrective coatings and water repellent lens coating on the exterior demonstrate that this is still a high quality optical instrument and will deliver a more than satisfactory image even in low light.


Let’s take a look at what’s important. First of all, the USCAMEL feels very solid. Their build quality is great, and they’re built to last. The body is rubber-coated, which allows for a comfortable and firm grip, and you get some shock resistance as well. They’re built for outdoor use, even in some more extreme conditions such as mountaineering or watersports. The fact that they’re dust-proof and waterproof means that they’ll survive whatever you decide to throw at them.
All three of these binos have superb optical quality, and all three earned perfect scores in our clarity in brightness testing. If we really split hairs, we would say that the Swarovski bins are just slightly brighter than the other two, and possibly just a tad clearer as well. However, we're talking about differences of maybe a percentage point or less, the kind of differences you can notice in our very controlled, side-by-side tests, no the kind of difference you'll notice when you throw your bins up to your eyes because you think you might have spotted a Kirtland's warbler. Bottom line, if you're willing to spend $2500+ on a pair of binos, you're going to get top-notch optics regardless of the brand you choose.
After saving for two years for an optics purchase, I am very happy with this product! Originally I had intended to buy a high end rifle scope, but why have a bunch of expensive rifle scopes sitting in the safe? Instead, I decided to streamline my archery hunting setup by going with rangefinding binos that I would get more use out of. Let's be honest, these Nikons are no Swarovskis, but they come pretty darn close to my Swaro EL 10x42. For long range rifle hunting here in the West, nothing beats my Swaro 10s and 15s along with my Gunwerks BR-2 rangefinder. Even though the Nikons boast 1900 yard ranging, for me it will be for archery only. It has been amazing white shooting 3D! Now for the hack mentioned above. I made a "silicon dimple" on the range button by masking off a little square with blue masking tape. Then I put a dollop of Mcnett's Seam Sealer on the button. When it cured (24 hours), I had a nice custom tactile range button I can locate with out looking. If you are picky about optics and know the value of a dollar...you won't be disappointed.
There is not much of a need for an astronomy binocular to be waterproof, water resistant is enough as using them at night can expose a binocular to dew and moisture, which can cause a non-waterproof model to mist up inside the mechanism. I would just like to say though that in general, better quality binoculars tend to be sealed and fully waterproof as well as fogproof and so this is one indicator to look out for if you want to make sure that the binoculars you are getting are of a good quality. (importance 2/10)
The magnification and objective of a binocular are always complimentary. The range of a rangefinder binocular also depends on these two aspects. You might have seen the binoculars being denoted by a set of numbers such as 7×20 or 10×42. What it denotes is the magnification and the diameter of the objective lens. For example, if the binocular is denoted by 7×20 it means that 7x is the magnification and 20 are the diameter of the objective lens. The magnification requirement depends on the purpose of your purchase. If you have bought it to take it to the movies, the ideal magnification would be anywhere from 3x to 5x. If the purpose something like sports, 7x would fair perfectly. But for hunting the best option would be 10x magnification. But one thing you have to keep in mind is that the field of view reduces with increase in magnification. The field of view of a 7x rangefinder binocular would be more than that of a binocular with 10x magnification. Also, it will be difficult to hold a rangefinder binocular which 10×42 for a long time as it will be heavy. The help of a tripod stand can be used in such cases.
Fusion 1-Mile uses the latest technology especially when it comes to the glass and lens. It uses the all-new XTR technology to provide the ultimate transmission of light. This, in turn, delivers great clarity and resolution. It has a waterproof coating which protects it from harsh conditions. The multi-coated casing also gives it protection from falls and other impacts. The quality of lenses and the sturdy construction makes it easy for you to carry it into the woods without worrying about damaging the device.
Open or Closed bridge refers to the center portion that connects the two optical tubes on roof prism binoculars. Typically, the center hinge and focusing mechanism will be enclosed in the housing. While this strengthens the hinge and mechanism, the closed bridge prevents your hands from wrapping all the way around. An open bridge will usually have the focus mechanism close to the eyepieces and another stabilizing section toward the objectives, with the middle section left open. This not only enables a full wraparound grip, but it also cuts the overall weight of the optic.

More rugged and robust: roof prisms are less susceptible to mis-alignment through shock damage from impact with hard objects or surfaces. They are also easier to waterproof — and are typically nitrogen or argon purged, making them impervious to dust and water, and preventing internal fogging in extreme conditions. When the going gets tough a good pair of roof prisms will typically keep performing long after a porro-prism binocular has given up.

A new company that we just brought into stock is GPO USA. Offered in 8x and 10x they are packed with the performance features you want: ED glass, Phase-corrected BAK4 prisms, Nitrogen-filled, Magnesium chassis, all the bells and whistles. I got a chance to try out the 8.5x50 version and they were incredible during the day, at dusk, and at night. The 42mm and 50mm both fall into your price range.
The little brother to the underwhelming 10x42 submitted in the full-size category, this 8x32 charmed the test team with its compactness and relatively better optics. Like on the full-size Fujifilm, the chassis of the mid-size KF feels flimsy, and the boxy style seems retro without the cool. On the upside, the testers liked the four-position eyecups and the overall balance of the open-bridge design. Very good image scores—­including low-light brightness—­elevated the KF’s ranking.
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I compared these side by side to Vortex Fury and Swarovski EL and could see no difference in optical quality. I have ranged beyond 1K yds without trouble on a tripod. As others have stated range results are returned quickly. Angle compensation is a plus (returns horizontal distance) One down side is the mushy rubber coating. Sand and dust stick to these thing like glue.
Over the years I’ve tested virtually every affordable image-stabilized binocular on the market for reviews appearing in Sky & Telescope magazine. Canon is the clear leader where astronomy is concerned. The company currently offers six models, each with something to interest the backyard stargazer. Some of these binoculars are among the very best available for astronomy, while some are more general purpose. (Fujinon also makes 14×40 image-stabilized binos. You can read my thoughts on this model here.)
Optically, the TrailSeeker offered exceptional light-gathering abilities. I remember watching a northern harrier soaring against the sky and the colors of the streaks below were as sharp as can be. Another bonus is this pair’s ability to focus close—as near as 6.5 feet, with a field of view of 426 feet at 1,000 yards. However, the outer edges of that expansive field of view had some mild distortion. The streaks on a Lincoln’s sparrow got a little mushy through the edges of the Celestron lenses, yet remained razor-sharp through the lenses of the Athlon Optics Midas ED. Most users probably won’t notice this, but the Athlons were clearly superior, to my trained eye.
Similarly to the USCAMEL mentioned above, the Hooway are also full of nitrogen, meaning they won’t fog up in subpar conditions. This could be a dealbreaker for many, and it’s good to see that Hooway thought of it. You get a wide field of view, as mentioned above, thanks to the porro prism system. The prism is BAK4, and the optics are fully coated. All of this combined gives you a crisp and bright image you’ll enjoy. And, you also get an illuminated compass that will prove to be useful, as well as an internal rangefinder to help you determine distance and the size of an object.

“Took these binoculars to see Cavalia Odesseo from the nosebleed section and I must say they gave me an excellent view of the horses and acrobatics. I could easily see the violin soloist, the Spanish guitarist, and the enchanting vocalist behind the shrouds on the balconies. I will never watch a stage performance the same way again. I find that at a certain distance, I didn’t have to adjust the focus as often as I had expected. The focal sweet spot is pretty large. There is a mild chromatic aberration when viewing in daylight hours against the light, but this goes away when I fine tune the focus. For the price, these binoculars can’t be beat.”
High quality optics and long-distance ranging capability come together in our all-new Fury™ HD 10x42 Laser Rangefinding Binocular. Convenience, speed, efficiency, and valuable dual-purpose functionality—all the advantages of a high-definition binocular perfectly paired with an angle compensated rangefinder. Right side controls are simple to use and easily manipulated with a single hand – leaving your other hand free to hold your bow, rifle, or other important piece of equipment.

Lens coatings are films applied to lens surfaces to reduce glare and reflections, increase light transmission and contrast, and help make colors look more vivid. Any light reflected is light that never reaches the viewer’s eyes, so by eliminating reflections, the image ends up being brighter and sharper. Coatings, in general, are good, provided that the coatings do something. It’s easy to put a cheap coating on a lens to give it a cool-looking orange tint, but the coating might not do anything to improve image quality. If you aren’t able to test a pair of binoculars before buying, the best you can do is research the brand, look for user reviews, and ask questions before you buy.


Close focusing is key when trying to see detail on things like butterflies, wildflowers, and the like. Our pick gets as near as 6.5 feet, and though a few binoculars focused closer than that, several contenders didn’t get anywhere near getting near. The Nikon Prostaff 5, for example, couldn’t bring objects any closer than 16 feet into focus. We liked the Prostaff 5 as a budget pick, but we warn that they’re not for looking at butterflies or anything that requires getting ultra-close for detail.
It uses high quality ED lens which are of HD (High Definition) quality and phase corrected BAK-4 prisms. Not to mention, all air to glass surfaces are fully multi coated providing you the best image quality ever. For some reasons (maybe due to the way it’s manufactured) it produces brighter and sharper image compared to other binoculars that use the same materials.

In recent years there's been a new twist on the bigger-is-better theme: giant binoculars. These are impressive, even imposing-looking devices. It's as if someone put your friendly 7x50s on steroids. Common apertures include 70, 80, and even 100 mm. (Fujinon even makes a 150-mm model — the equivalent of two 6-inch telescopes, one for each eye!) For such beasts a tripod, preferably with a special binocular mount that allows you to aim upward, is mandatory. While they're a good supplement to your gear collection, I don't recommend giant binoculars as your primary instruments — they're just too unwieldy. Get more modest 7x40s or 10x50s first, and consider buying these big shots later.
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