The magnification and objective of a binocular are always complimentary. The range of a rangefinder binocular also depends on these two aspects. You might have seen the binoculars being denoted by a set of numbers such as 7×20 or 10×42. What it denotes is the magnification and the diameter of the objective lens. For example, if the binocular is denoted by 7×20 it means that 7x is the magnification and 20 are the diameter of the objective lens. The magnification requirement depends on the purpose of your purchase. If you have bought it to take it to the movies, the ideal magnification would be anywhere from 3x to 5x. If the purpose something like sports, 7x would fair perfectly. But for hunting the best option would be 10x magnification. But one thing you have to keep in mind is that the field of view reduces with increase in magnification. The field of view of a 7x rangefinder binocular would be more than that of a binocular with 10x magnification. Also, it will be difficult to hold a rangefinder binocular which 10×42 for a long time as it will be heavy. The help of a tripod stand can be used in such cases.
1. Binoculars are a better place to start than telescopes. The fact is that most people who think they want to buy a telescope would be better off using binoculars for a year or so instead.  That’s because first-time telescope users often find themselves completely confused – and ultimately put off – by the dual tasks of learning the use a complicated piece of equipment (the ‘scope) while at the same time learning to navigate an unknown realm (the night sky).

The angle and distance display has the ability to be set to one of four different intensities, which can be a pretty useful feature if you intend on using the binoculars in various lighting conditions. When you have a moving target, there’s the ability for a continuous measurement, and it lasts up to 8 seconds. Accuracy of the measurement is incredible, with a very small margin of error – at 100 meters or less, it’s accurate to 0.1 meters, which is very impressive.
Another recent innovation is image-stabilized binoculars. These employ the same ingenious mechanisms found inside the best video cameras. Push a button and the shaky magnified view suddenly calms down, almost freezing in place. The result is that you can use higher magnifications, get away with slightly less aperture, and yet still see more than with conventional binoculars.
The first step to choosing the right pair of binoculars is understanding what all of the different specifications mean. The most prominent specification notated on binoculars, and one of the most important, is a figure that looks something like 10x70 or 25x100. These two numbers represent magnification and lens diameter. The first number is the amount of times a particular pair of binoculars can magnify an image. The second number is the size of the objective lens, which is measured in millimeters. The objective lens is the one at the end of the binoculars closest to the object you are viewing. So a pair of binoculars labeled as 25x100 would make an image look 25 times closer than it actually is and have an objective lens diameter of 100 millimeters. The objective lens is responsible for gathering light, and the larger it is, the more light it can gather and the brighter the image will appear. Since there is not a lot of light in space, it is important to choose a pair of astronomy binoculars with a large lens diameter.
Bill Stewart says that he has seen many beginning birders make the mistake of buying binoculars based on a brand or recommendation and then finding themselves disappointed with the feel or view they experience in the field. He also has seen birders “buy down instead of up” to save some money initially. They often end up spending more the second time around when they feel that they need to upgrade to a better pair, he says.
If you are going to a place where others are already viewing the stars, it is necessary that you be careful not to interrupt their viewing by thoughtlessly shining your flashlight around. Make sure that your eyes have thoroughly adjusted before moving about. You should also reduce the light level by draping red cellophane or a red handkerchief over the light to lessen the glare.
Sturdy, lightweight, and compact the Bushnell Fusion ARC binocular laser rangefinder offers the complete package for distance calculation married with excellent optical viewing ability. The 8X magnification coupled with a 32mm lens diameter provides an outstanding viewing experience. If that was not enough, these binoculars also feature an angle range compensation (ARC) laser that can precisely detect and determine ranges between 10 and 1760 yards.
dless of whether you’re an expert with an extensive collection of rangefinder binoculars, or someone who’s only getting their first pair, choosing the right ones can be tricky. Making the wrong choice can cost you $90-100, or it could easily go into the thousands if you buy a premium pair of binoculars. When you consider all of the variables, making a wrong choice isn’t that hard. Things such as zoom or fixed, or image stabilization, or even the numbers in the name can be confusing for someone who isn’t well versed in the topic. However, as you saw above, clearing them up isn’t that difficult, and if you do know what you need, getting the right pair isn’t all that difficult either.

Combining excellent optical performance with ruggedness, portability, and comfort, the 10x50 Diamondback Binocular from Vortex Optics (B&H # VODB10X50) is ideal to take along on your hiking trips, camping, traveling, or just in case. The specially designed optics feature improved transmission, contrast, and true color using fully multi-coated lenses and phase-corrected roof prisms. With the improved close focus of 7' you will get plenty of focusing range and a sharp focus on faraway scenery as well as close-ups of nearby street signs, monuments' details, or wildlife. The combination of 10x magnification and the 50mm objectives, which are ideal for low-light conditions and even star-gazing, offers you a generous 6° angle of view that gives you complete images of targets.
But even with all these improvements, binoculars will vary in important ways. A few models close focus down to 5 feet away or even a little closer, though at least one popular model reaches no closer than 16 feet away, making them a no-go for seeing butterflies and other up-close objects. The field of view (how large an area you see when you look out into the distance) is also variable and differed by more than 20 percent across models tested for this review.
Olaf Soltau, a member of the New York Chapter of the Audubon Society, shared his experiences and opinion: “I use Swarovski EL 10x42s. But it took years before I felt ready to move up from 8x to 10x. For beginners, I always suggest 8x40. Think Goldilocks: not too strong, not too weak, not too heavy, not too flimsy. It's simply the best compromise. Higher magnification makes the image too shaky and the birds too hard to find, especially for beginning birders. Lower magnification simply doesn't bring the birds close enough. There are, of course, exceptions. 10x40s are OK if most birding takes place in wide open spaces like grasslands and coastlines, where the birds are often far away. I used 8x40s for years until my hand had gotten steady enough and my bird-finding-through-binos skills had become good enough for 10x40s. Another exception: People who don't have the physical strength to carry 8x40s around all day long can opt for 8x30s, but that means sacrificing image quality.”
What makes the Athlon Optics Midas ED binoculars great? For starters, their brightness. A lot of birding and using binoculars in general involves looking out or up at something much brighter, like the sky, or darker, such as into a dense thicket. Just as your autofocus camera can’t figure out how to illuminate something against a bright (or overcast) sky, binoculars may have difficulty mustering the light needed to brighten the distant object you’re trying to identify. Also tough is the inverse of this situation, looking into dark, dense vegetation, a situation in which you need all the light-gathering ability the binoculars can give you. The Athlon Optics Midas ED performed well on both fronts. For example, several other models tested would not allow me to differentiate throat coloration of warblers in treetops early in the morning. With the Athlons, it was almost as if the glaring, whitish background of sky wasn’t there—the colors popped to life.
The center of mass should be in the prisms, comfortably over your palms. If the objectives at the front are too massive, they will create a lever that torques your wrists. You will see your muscle fatigue in the form of jittery images. Was that a black-chinned hummingbird? Or just a clearwing hawk moth? If you had lighter binoculars, you would know!
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