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These Vortex are really nice, with phase-corrected prisms to keep images sharp and colors accurate, and wide angles of view. They're water and fogproof also, so they'll stand up to inclement weather great. I also like the mid-sized 42mm objectives which will give them good low-light capabilities when a lot of game . https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1200179-REG/vortex_db_204_8x42_diamondback_binocular_green_black.html
The only pairs with a locking diopter are the Leica Ultravid BCR and the Vortex Viper. The top pairs in this group with the smoothest adjustments and easiest focus were the Vortex Viper HD 8x42 and the Nikon Monarch 7 ATB 10x42. With all of these models even novices were able to follow birds in flight and keep them in focus without much issue. This is attributable to their smooth focus knobs.
Here the Leica bins have a slight edge. When comparing the 10x magnification models, Leica provides a 376-foot wide field of view at 1000 yards. The Swarovski bins are second with a 336-foot field of view, and Zeiss comes in last at 330 feet. If you opt for an 8x magnification model the Leica and Zeiss field of views increase to 443 and 408 feet, respectively. Swarovski does not make 8x bins, but the 8.5x version provides a field of view of 399 feet.

If you want to explore the great outdoors with your kids, then the Educational Insights GeoSafari binoculars are the best pair to get them started. The pair of kid-friendly binoculars feature soft-grip handles for smaller hands, while kids can explore nature in-depth with their 30mm glass lenses and 4x magnification. There's also a trusty compass attached for some light orienteering. Moms and dads will love that these binoculars can help their kiddos get into STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) learning. 


The area of space that you can see through binoculars is smaller than expected when compared with what can be seen with the naked eye. For this reason, it is better to find the stars (or constellations) that you want to view with your naked eye first. Keeping your gaze fixed on the same spot, swiftly bring the binoculars up to the level of your eyes and peer through them. Another way is to find a bright star and, using that star as a reference point, gradually move your binoculars’ field of vision in the direction of the galaxy or star cluster that you wish to view.
For high magnification binoculars and those with an effective objective lens diameter over 50mm, we recommend the use of a tripod to stabilize the binoculars for viewing, as they may cause unstable image and uncomfortable viewing due to shaking by hand movement. This is also a convenient method for steadying your field of vision for extended viewing.

Notably both the Nikon Monarch 5 8x42 and the Vortex Diamondback 8x42 also earned scores of 8 out of 10 in our clarity testing. This is impressive considering that both modles list for less than $300. While these model both have slightly more edge blurring than the top scoring products, they generally provide a super crisp, immersive image, allowing us to easily pick out all the minute, defining features of our bird models.
Next: see if you can detect whether the binoculars' two barrels are out of optical alignment, or "collimation." Experienced users can pick up on this relatively quickly, but beginners have a harder time of it, because your eye and brain automatically try to compensate for any misalignment. The best way I can describe this is that out-of-alignment binoculars will make you feel slightly "seasick." In really bad cases you may have trouble merging the two images into one, at least right away. Or maybe you'll have a mild sense of relief when you stop looking through them. Reject such units.

The built-in matrix display works well in all lighting conditions to provide accurate distance measurements. The optics are coated with multiple films for outstanding image clarity, and the binoculars use BAK-4 prisms for sharp details. Fully waterproof with incorporated anti-fog technology, the Bushnell Fusion offers incredible image clarity, superior range finding, and industry-leading optical technology. It is one of the best range finding binoculars you can buy.
Now, it’s no secret that there are plenty of choices. From cheap, sub-par quality pairs of binoculars with rangefinders, to high-end, premium options from reputable manufacturers which have supreme build quality and optics, the market is fairly saturated. This means that there is something for everyone. Whether you’re after an entry-level option that’s great for only a few things that you really need, or a premium binocular from the likes of Carl Zeiss and Swarovski that have everything you need, and more, as well as some added benefits in terms of quality and optics, you can get something that’s right for you.
One thing you'll need to think about is how to attach your big astronomy binoculars to your tripod. Most binoculars are fitted with a standard size threaded socket and are ready to accept a tripod adapter. After unscrewing the hinge cap on the end of the hinge nearest the objective lenses, screw the adapter into the hinge socket, tighten it, and mount the other end of the adapter on the tripod's pan head. When selecting a binocular tripod adapter, you'll want one whose screw's knob will work equally well with roof and Porro prism designs as well as the tight space on some larger binoculars. We like the knob design on the Vortex tripod adapter because its slender shape allows it to be used with nearly any binocular.
In the past i have paid $100 ( when that was a lot of money) for binoculars that were no better than these. Great buy for $37. Once you get used to how they work they are excellent for watching Bald Eagles and other raptors in Cape May Point lighthouse sanctuary. Small enough to keep in the car, and if they get broken, well, it's only $37 so I'll pick up another pair.
This is a supersized binocular suited to glassing distant targets for long periods of time. The double-hinge design creates a nice space for hands to hold it, but you will probably want to mount this 3-pound Leupold on a tripod. The mounting bracket is smartly located on the inside hinge of the Leupold (see Innovations, right). Hits: tight controls, the battleship-gray armor, the webby texture that wraps the aluminum-alloy chassis, and the first-rate carry case and neck strap. Misses: disappointing resolution and image quality.
Most roof prism binoculars are made in Germany. Porro prism binoculars are made in Japan. Whatever design you choose make sure the binocular has Bak-4 prisms and the lens is fully multi-coated. Also because it is a well known European brand does not mean it is safe to buy that binocular. Some binoculars are shipped to Germany from Korea with no country of origin marked on the binoculars. When said binoculars left Germany they were then stamped as being made in Germany. On a similar note, if buying binoculars made in either the former Soviet Union or China you might be getting a good deal, but buyer beware. If you can, try them out first and make sure the dealer has a liberal return policy.
To find the best binoculars, we had a professional ornithologist spend over 100 hours field-testing 17 pairs against his own $2,500 Leica Ultravids. After using our test pairs in the mountains and hills of Southern California, then on a research trip to the rain forests of southern Mexico, he found that the Athlon Optics Midas ED 8×42 pair was the best of the group, offering performance comparable to his Leicas for a fraction of the price and the widest field of view out of all the binoculars tested. This means you’ll see more, and it will look better.
Best for City Birding: As bad as it sounds, rising at 5:00 a.m. has its rewards. Even on a murky spring day, the sky can have a surreal spark. Our resident downy woodpecker, an outlier camped among cardinals and chickadees, begins to lope and scamper in the breeze, tracing a parabolic line from trunk to trunk. We also have some nuthatches, goldfinches, titmice, and very occasionally a yellow-bellied sapsucker. We’re up high, third floor, facing east and west, a real hierarchy of light. Sometimes the morning sun is so enormous it’s as if a great fire is swallowing Back Bay, precisely the kind of place that requires a huge field of view, and the Diamondback has the largest of its class: 420 feet at 1,000 yards.
"It's hard to know where to begin, when you decide you want to get more involved in stargazing. The Celestron SkyMaster Binoculars are a fantastic entrance into the world of stargazing, for a low price point! If you're unsure if you'd like to take stargazing up as a professional hobby, these are a fantastic buy, to help you see the stars and to see if you'd like to further explore astronomy!"
There are still other denizens of the solar system you can capture through binocs. Look for the occasional comet, which appears as a fuzzy blob of light. Then there are the asteroids – fully 12 of them can be followed with binoculars when they are at their brightest. Because an asteroid looks star-like, the secret to confirming its presence is to sketch a star field through which it’s passing. Do this over subsequent nights; the star that changes position relative to the others is our solar system interloper.

Have you just purchased a binocular and you're finding it has shortcomings you'd rather not live with? Hopefully you purchased from a retailer who offers a 30-day evaluation and return period. You'll find some of the online retailers offer a 30-day evaluation and return period which can make a difference in how satisfying you find your new purchase.
Canon recently refreshed their line up of image-stabilized binoculars with new versions of their venerable 10×30 and 12×36 models. (They’ve also released three completely new binoculars utilizing a different image-stabilization mechanism: 10×32, 12×32, and 14×32, due out some time in November, 2017.) The 12×36s go from version II (reviewed here) to III, and the 10×30s are updated to version II. What are the differences and are the changes a reason to upgrade? To find out, I obtained a 10×30 IS II to evaluate. Continue reading “Review: Canon 10×30 IS II Image-Stabilized Binoculars”
Again, you tend to get what you pay for here to some degree, and optics from established top-flight brands are usually incredibly well made (my binoculars are still the best made piece of equipment I have ever owned). That said there are plenty of very well made binoculars in the low-to-mid range from manufacturers who take quality every bit as seriously as the premium brands.
Get Used to Feeling Them - The best way to use your binoculars when looking for objects in the night sky is to do so without looking at the binoculars themselves Instead, learn to bring them up to your eyes without looking away from the object you want to magnify, this pretty much guarantees you'll see the object straight away and won't have to sweep around the sky trying to find it again.

A constant question I am asked is, “What’s the difference between nitrogen and argon?” A quick Google search will return many links to forums where people have very strong opinions on the matter and will get into any number of online arguments over the subject. The short answer is that, performance-wise, there really isn’t much of a difference between the two for the clear majority of people. Both gases will keep moisture out and prevent internal fogging. If you do a deep-dive into the chemistry and look at a diagram of each molecule, you will see that argon molecules are larger than nitrogen molecules. Because of this, some manufacturers feel the larger argon molecules will have a harder time leaking out from the seals, keeping the inert gas inside longer and thus maintaining their water/fog-proof properties over a longer period of time. From a practical standpoint, as long as you have an optic with either of these inert dry gases versus having none, you’re ahead of the game.
The larger SkyMaster models (80mm and 100mm ) have been designed by Celestron to meet the special demands of extended astronomical or terrestrial viewing sessions and include features like enhanced structural reinforcement to the main binocular body. and an integral super rigid photo tripod adapter to enable easy attachment to tripods and other fixing devices.
Whilst it is obviously important that the rangefinder accurately measures distance to target, you should most certainly not forget the quality of the chassis and the optics contained within. Your instrument needs to be tough enough to withstand the elements and the quality of glass and coatings largely determine the quality of the image and the level of detail that can be seen.
Really, you'll be OK with even smaller binoculars, as long as they are of high-quality optical glass. You can carry an 8x35 pair all day for bird- (or people) watching, and they won't make your arms tremble — and your stars dance like drunkards — when you pick them up at night. The wider view-field of most lower-power binoculars is usually a plus for skywatching.
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